Gaby DiCervo

Gaby DiCervo is a third-degree black belt in Shotokan, she also teaches kickboxing, self-defense, and krav maga. She is a fashion blogger at http://www.fiercelybeautifulblog.com
Who Is Gaby DiCervo?
Gaby DiCervo was born on December 16, 1995, in Livingston, NJ. She graduated from Belleville high school and attended LIM for fashion merchandiser. She is the Manager at Sovereign Martial Arts Of Howell and Owner at Fiercely Beautifulblog.com.

Early Life and Career
Born Gabrielle Ange Diaz-Cervo on December 16, 1995, in Livingston, New Jersey, Gaby DiCervo began Karate with her sister and brother at age 2 and dropped out of college to advance her business in karate. It was there that she performed in videos and tournaments. She did different advertisings for karate, self-defense, kickboxing and krav maga.
In 2010, Gaby signed with Sovereign Martial Arts as a head instructor and she worked as a model for different designers and boutiques.FullSizeRender(2)FullSizeRender-8

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Money

My relationship with money, when I go to the mall I take the entrance at Lord & Taylor or Neiman Marcus, it helps me to be exposed to more wealth. I looked at the price tag of the Louis Vuitton’s bags, the custom-made jewelry, the expensive perfumes, the expensive shoes, and clothes. I also pass by the Arts gallery where the painting goes for thousands of dollars.
When I go visit my mother and we talked about business and most of the times, she complained and her favorite line is “ There is no money”. In the meantime, she is always buying fabrics and some of these fabrics are very expensive. My mother is only seventy-four years old and I took her to an area in New Jersey that is very rich and the mansions cost five to ten million dollars, still, her mindset was still blocked to the overflow of wealth in this world. I want to own a million dollar home before she transitions to the next world so she can expose to the abundance in this world.
My son wants to give me my dream mansion and car. I feel so grateful and proud of him because he is a kind young man and a karate instructor and a model.6-2009 123.jpg

5 Tips to Master the Delicate Art of Delegation

 


By Clark Valberg @ClarkValberg

 

Control freak. Workaholic. Credit hog.

Managers who fall into one or more of these groups usually have one thing in common: a refusal to delegate. Often, though, these managers are none of the above. They just haven’t mastered the emotional balance of delegation.

Entrepreneurs and leaders are programmed to despise laziness. That trait is a big part of why they’ve succeeded. With that comes a level of guilt — if they can do more, they should. And in a new business, there’s always more to be done.

Despite how painful it may be, delegation is a critical skill all leaders must master to be successful. Not only will delegation give you more brain space and time to devote to doing what you do best — visionary thought — but you’ll also empower your team. Being self-aware enough to recognize this is step one. It’s hard to do, but is anything worth doing ever not?

Humility is a sorely underrated trait for a leader. By trusting your team and accepting that you can’t do it all, you’ll accomplish much more as a group than you could have ever accomplished alone. Here are some insights into how to find the right balance for you.

1. Be thoughtful about what you can hand off.

Take a clear stock of the tasks you have on hand and assess which ones aren’t using your time and skills to their fullest. For those tasks that emerge as delegate-able, incorporate delegation into your existing workflow via staff development and project management plans. You don’t want delegation to be just another task you have to do, but rather a natural part of your existing processes.

2. Choose tasks that prioritize your teammates’ careers with increased responsibility.

Every leader knows the most successful businesses are the ones with the strongest teams. For your team members to grow individually, they must have opportunities to prove themselves. You may worry that if you empower them and expand their skill sets, they’ll just leave. To that concern I’d say, you should be more worried if you don’t — and they stay. Delegate tasks that push your team members outside of their comfort zone and challenge them to reach a new level of creativity and leadership.

3. Channel the time and intensity you would have devoted to the job at hand and redirect that time into educating someone else.

How many times have you felt like you were too busy to train someone? Yet, it’s in training others that we cultivate confidence in handing off a task, and show our team members we value their continued growth. Effective teaching and mentorship is its own worthwhile skill you can practice here — when it starts to feel difficult, remind yourself that not only are you helping your employees grow, you’re stretching and strengthening your own teaching muscles, too.

4. Get out of the way.

I tell my teams to “make it awesome” and let them run with it. I’ve found they do best when they know I have a high expectation but want them to get there without hand holding. Instead of requiring people to do the work exactly how you would have, respect and appreciate the varied styles your teams use to get to the end result. Make sure the technical aspects of the task are clearly defined, but allow room for independent thought. If you’ve hired well, your mentorship will plant the seed for some great ideas you may never have even considered.

5. Persevere.

Recognize that teaching and learning is not always a linear process, and it doesn’t happen smoothly or overnight. The person you chose to delegate to might not grasp exactly what you’re saying the first time around. They may put in a good faith effort but fall short. Don’t use this as an excuse to snatch responsibility back. Use it as a learning tool to recognize where the process went wrong and how it can be made better.

Being a self-aware leader means acknowledging that you aren’t a super hero. You’ve intentionally hired your team members to bring skills to the table that you lack. Use smart delegation techniques to grow those employees — and watch your business grow as a result.

PEARL

It takes three years for a pearl to form, it takes lots of pressure, therefore, you need to know that every test has an expiration.
The work of a pearl is hiding.
Pearl25660074_10203894634564376_1700075491851529608_n is expensive.
Pearl has a shine.
Have the discipline to tell everybody your problems during the trials and test.
Have the courage not to cheat during the trials
You will not get any answer during the trials.
Do not rush the process or you could waste precious resources.

How to Discover Your Genius

By Thomas Oppong

Genetic potential alone does not predict extraordinary accomplishment.

Einstein once said Genius is 1% talent and 99% hard work.

He also said, “Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”

Intelligence is not final.

“The fact is, intelligence can be increased–and quite dramatically,” writes behavior-analytic psychologist Bryan Roche of the National University of Ireland in Psychology Today.

Finding your genius is easy: choose your craft, do the work, find ways to improve, show up again tomorrow. Repeat for five years. Or ten. Or twenty.

David Shenk, author of The Genius in All of Us, says anyone has the potential for genius or, at the very least, greatness. The key is to let go of the myth that giftedness is innate. If you want to be a genuis, it’s not only possible; it’s within reach but it will cost you.

Shenk explains: “You have to want it, want it so bad you will never give up, so bad that you are ready to sacrifice time, money, sleep, friendships, even your reputation,” he writes. “You will have to adopt a particular lifestyle of ambition, not just for a few weeks or months but for years and years and years. You have to want it so bad that you are not only ready to fail, but you actually want to experience failure: revel in it, learn from it.”

Your genius is multiple deliberate practices away. “It’s not that I’m so smart,” says Einstein. “It’s just that I stay with problems longer.”

Einstein’s simple statement is a clarion call for all who seek greatness. In the end, persistence is the difference between mediocrity and incredible achievement.

Genius is the courage to let go. To embrace your authentic self. It’s the permission you give yourself to be purely you.

It’s the confidence to share your true self in your work, art, or life. It’s something that is discovered, honed, and improved through real work.

In “Beyond Talent”, John C. Maxwell asserts that a person’s natural abilities are overrated and frequently misunderstood. While talent is an undeniable advantage, it accomplishes nothing by itself.

If talent is not paired with the right mindset and decisions, it wastes away and eventually evaporates. Everyone has an area of giftedness — something they do exceptionally well.

Thomas Edison invented the phonograph and the first commercially viable light bulb, but those were just two of the thousand-plus U.S. patents he was awarded.

Genius arrives when you show up enough times to get the average ideas out of the way. Chuck Close once said, “Inspiration is for amateurs. The rest of us just show up and get to work.”

Psychologist Dean Keith Simonton, an expert on genius, maintains that the arc of a career depends on two things: your chosen discipline, and how soon you master it.

Picasso worked for decades to master his craft. So did Leonardo da Vinci. And Mozart and every other genuis you admire.

Hungarian photographer Brassaï once asked Picasso whether his ideas come to him “by chance or by design,” and Picasso responded: “I don’t have a clue. Ideas are simply starting points. I can rarely set them down as they come to my mind. As soon as I start to work, others well up in my pen. To know what you’re going to draw, you have to begin drawing… When I find myself facing a blank page, that’s always going through my head. What I capture in spite of myself interests me more than my own ideas.”

Leonardo’s pathway to genius began with an apprenticeship with master artist Andrea del Verrocchio in Florence when he was a teenager.

Obstacles cannot crush me,” he once wrote. “He who is fixed to a star does not change his mind,” says Leonardo.

With help from his father, Michelangelo also landed an apprenticeship with Domenico Ghirlandaio, a Florentine painter. The teacher soon sent his gifted student to work in Lorenzo de’ Medici’s sculpture garden.

That break immersed Michelangelo in some of the world’s greatest art.

Some minds are so exceptional they change the world. But not without deliberate consistent work.

“The number one predictor of impact is productivity,” says Dean Keith Simonton, professor emeritus of psychology at UC Davis and a longtime scholar of genius.

Big hits emerge after many attempts.

It took Charles Darwin five years to collect data during his Beagle trip to come up with a vision of the evolutionary process. Yet it took him another 20 years collecting all necessary material, and opinions before mustering the courage to publish “On the origin of species”.

It’s time to give yourself permission to fully share your greatest contribution with the rest of us without hesitation. If you are not already doing this, this post is a personal reminder to you to embrace your genuis.

Gladwell is a believer in deliberate practice to hone your genius. “Practice isn’t the thing you do once you’re good,” he writes. “It’s the thing you do that makes you good.”

Uncommon achievement requires an uncommon level of grit and a massiveamount of faith even when you keep failing. You need a deeper connection to stay on the same path for years.

In short, genius develops over time.

It requires daily remolding of your neural connections.

Work hard, make it smart and be patient. Stay with problems longer, and you will find your breakthrough.

Genius Takes Time And Extraordinary Effort

Humans differ in brain power. Some get a biological head start, others improve over time. It cannot be stressed enough though that the optimum path towards maximum achievement is always through persistent training.

The brain is adaptable, and consistent practice can create skills that did not exist before…Learning isn’t a way of reaching one’s potential but rather a way of developing it.

You can create your own potential.

A genius brain in action will tackle a problem, quickly find an appropriate set of rules, and derive a solution.

It turns out greatness is within reach if you want it bad enough. “Your calling,” Frederick Buechner famously wrote, “is the place where your deepest joy meets the world’s deepest need.”

“The fact is, intelligence can be increased–and quite dramatically,” writes behavior-analytic psychologist Bryan Roche of the National University of Ireland in Psychology Today.

“Those who claim that IQ is fixed for life are in fact referring to our IQ test scores, which are relatively stable–not to our intelligence levels, which is constantly increasing.”

From Mozart to Bill Gates, genius’s diverse journeys toward peak performance in their respective fields shared a common trait: an unwavering dedication to their crafts and the commitment to developing their skills.

High achievements in all fields require hours of training. This refers to music, chess, sciences, sports and what not. Buckminster Fuller said, “I’m not a genius. I’m just a tremendous bundle of experience.”

David Shenk, author of “The Genius in All of Us, says anyone has the potential for genius or, at the very least, greatness. The key is to let go of the myth that giftedness is innate. “You have to want it, want it so bad you will never give up, so bad that you are ready to sacrifice time, money, sleep, friendships, even your reputation,” he writes.

When you examine closely, even the most extreme examples of history’s creative and innovative minds — Mozart, Newton, Einstein, Picasso — you find more hard-won mastery than gift.

Geniuses are made over time

It took Darwin five years to collect data during his Beagle trip to come up with a vision of the evolutionary process. Yet it took him another 20 years collecting all necessary material, and opinions before mustering the courage to publish “On the origin of species”.

The extraordinary commitment of the young Mozart, under the guidance of his father, produced one of the most prolific and influential composers of the classical era. Mozart had clocked up 3500 hours by the time he was 6 and had studied his chosen profession for 18 years before he wrote his Piano Concerto No 9 at the age of 21.

Top athletes don’t become experts at what they do by simply practicing; they get there through purposeful practice. The differences between expert performers, creatives, and normal professionals reflect a life-long persistence of deliberate, purposeful effort to improve performance.

Tiger Woods started when he was 2 years old. Serena Williams started playing at 3, Venus Williams at 4. They committed to deep, sustained immersion in purposeful practice.

Uncommon achievement requires an uncommon level of grit and a massive amount of faith even when you keep failing. You need a deeper connection to stay on the same path for years.

Anyone can achieve mastery with purposeful practice.

With considerable, specific, and sustained efforts over time, you can do most things you struggle with. You can only turn into the expert you want to become by deliberate, purposeful practice.

Deliberate practice can do miracles to your mind.

Genius requires extraordinary efforts

Geniuses, past and present are normally identified by perseverance, concentration, insane drive, and absolute focus on the one thing they do well. Dedication of an unusual degree is required to achieve mastery.

Einstein had extremely high intelligence but he genuinely loved his pursuit of Relativity. He was constantly curious and willing to consider radical new ideas. He committed a greater percentage of his productive years pursuing the theory of relatively. And it meant everything to him.

“It’s complicated explaining how genius or expertise is created and why it’s so rare,” says Anders Ericsson, the professor of psychology at Florida State University. In his new book, Peak: Secrets From the New Science of Expertise, he says, “abilities gradually deteriorate in the absence of deliberate efforts to improve,”

“But it isn’t magic, and it isn’t born. It happens because some critical things line up so that a person of good intelligence can put in the sustained, focused effort it takes to achieve extraordinary mastery.

Hungarian photographer Brassaï once asked Picasso whether his ideas come to him “by chance or by design,” and Picasso responded: “I don’t have a clue. Ideas are simply starting points. I can rarely set them down as they come to my mind. As soon as I start to work, others well up in my pen. To know what you’re going to draw, you have to begin drawing… When I find myself facing a blank page, that’s always going through my head. What I capture in spite of myself interests me more than my own ideas.”

Mozart was immersed in a musical culture and practice from early childhood — often cited as a key factor towards his genius. Despite personal challenges, he studied hard under his father to learn the techniques of the established masters including Bach, Handel and Haydn.

He once wrote to a friend about his commitment to music and said: “People err who think my art comes easily to me. I assure you, dear friend, nobody has devoted so much time and thought to compositions as I. There is not a famous master whose music I have not industriously studied through many times.”

Nurturing and following your curiosity can help you discover meaningful work. Passion is not always obvious but curiosity can lead to amazing discoveries. Follow your curiosity and you will be amazed at where that leads you.

In “Beyond Talent”, John C. Maxwell asserts that a person’s natural abilities are overrated and frequently misunderstood. While talent is an undeniable advantage, it accomplishes nothing by itself.

If talent is not paired with the right mindset and decisions, it wastes away and eventually evaporates. Everyone has an area of giftedness — something they do exceptionally well.

However, the pivotal choices you make in life — apart from the natural talent you possess — will set you apart from the masses of people trying to skate by on talent alone.

Colvin argues in Talent is Overrated that deliberate, methodical, and sustained practice is the way to achieve true mastery.

“Deliberate practice is hard. It hurts. But it works. More of it equals better performance. Tons of it equals great performance.” Colvin writes.

The biggest difference between you and Picasso or Einstein, or the most creative minds of our time is that they embraced the long road to mastery.

They spent more time in front of a canvas, or guitar, or computer, working away at applying their minds and souls to the one thing they wanted to do. Most of what we think of as natural talent is really just the result of having started practice early.

To build genius, your learning program must be based on the high applicability of newly acquired skills and knowledge.

In short, genius develops over years of daily remolding of your neural connections. Work hard, make it smart and be patient. Stay with problems longer, and you will find your breakthrough.

by Thomas Oppong

Adopt The 10x Mindset

By Thomas Oppong

There are no absolutes in life. And there are no givens. Everything is up for grabs. Most people dream of accomplishing something extraordinary in life. But life slips by and their most meaningful dreams slide silently to the side while they’re getting everything else done.

Grant Cardone says, “Never reduce a target. Instead, increase actions. When you start rethinking your targets, making up excuses, and letting yourself off the hook, you are giving up on your dreams!”

Operating at an exponentially higher level is exactly what you need to do better and be successful in your endeavors. But everything starts with a decision to aim higher than usual. Only those with the right mindset, attitude and skill can take advantage of the enormous human potential.

You can’t achieve extraordinary results with an ordinary mindset

“The greatest danger for most of us is not that our aim is too high and we miss it, but that it is too low and we reach it.”― Michelangelo Buonarroti

Many people are far below their expectations because they have big dreams, incredible ideas, and fantastic goals but put in little or no ACTION.

As you build on your accomplishments and your confidence grows, you will naturally want to aim higher. Now that you’ve got some momentum going, it’s time to double your effort.

Extreme success in your own terms can only be achieved by taking massive action with the 10X rule, a concept made popular by Grant Cardone.

The 10X rule is based on the idea you should figure out what you want to do, goals you want to achieve, and multiply the effort and time you think it’ll take to do by 10.

In his book, 10x Rule, The Only Difference Between Success and FailureGrant provides an awesome blueprint for how you can rise above the status quo to take “massive action” instead of behaving like everybody else and settling for average results.

“The greatest turning point of my life, both professionally and personally, was when I stopped casually waiting for success and instead started to approach it as a duty, obligation and responsibility,” says Cardone.

We have a tendency to underestimate what we can accomplish, and therefore set lower goals and not reach our full potential.

When you apply the 10x rule and mindset to your thinking, and apply it to how you act, you can do more in the shortest possible time. And you will still have time to take care of a lot of other things on your to-do list.

Stay hungry!

The idea of a 10x advantage is to aim ten times higher when you set your goals in business and life. You are probably not thinking big enough about your life’s work, projects, and what you want to achieve in your career.

A 10x mindset or goal means that if you come up short, you’ll still find yourself further along than if you had maintained your life’s current goals, visions and everything else you have planned to achieve.

Christopher Reeve once said, “So many of our dreams at first seem impossible, then they seem improbable, and then, when we summon the will, they soon become inevitable.”

And it also means that you open yourself up to bigger possibilities for the future that make it increasingly easier to make decisions and take action in the present. You can move and work your goals 10 times faster while being consistent and persistent.

But don’t underestimate how much energy and effort it will take to push things through though. Things could take longer to complete or cost more. Plan for these things you plan to focus on ahcieving more using the 10x rule.

Thinkers and dreamers are the new untouchables

“Between the great things we cannot do and the small things we will not do, the danger is that we shall do nothing.” — Adolph Monod

We’ve been conditioned to think small, simplify and to expect less and demand less from life. Don’t be subject to the tyranny of “how things have always been done”. Find your true north and push past the default.

For centuries we’ve been trained by the system to stop thinking and do as we are told. But dreamers and thinkers change the world. They don’t follow any logic. It’s hard to replace the dreamers with algorithms.

Can you build something people will look for, will talk about or something we would miss if it were gone. Think about your capacity to think creatively and exponentially. And your your capacity to provide value to others. Start seeing things from a wider and far reaching perspective.

You should start thinking big without reservations. Practice thinking about your future being 10x bigger and better, and you’ll develop a new 10x standard for viewing the world.

You can only contribute more, learn more, become more and stretch yourself and your own abilities beyond their current psychological limitations if you give yourself permission to think beyond the obvious.

Turn mindset into action

The right intentions will only get you so far. You also must act. A 10x mindset radically shifts your thinking, your decision-making, and the actions you take.

Start identifying actions that are blocking your progress toward 10x growth and get rid of them. Focus on doing even better at those things you’re already good at and stop worrying about everything you struggle with.

Tackle every project with the 10X Rule, acting like you have to succeed because your life depends on it.

Before you go…

If you enjoyed this post, you will love Postanly Weekly (my free digest of the best productivity, career and self-improvement posts). Subscribe and get a free copy of my new eBook, “The Power of One Percent Better: Small Gains, Maximum Results”. Join 23,300+ readers.

What’s the cheapest business to start?

By Erik Tozier

I was grabbing a coffee with a friend the other day and in the coffee shop, we got into a conversation with a gentleman who started telling us about his food truck. He was going on about how they originally took a $50k loan to get the business going, and how he was spending 16 hours a day on the business. I was supportive and respectful, but not how I look to go about my businesses. 16 hours a day at the beginning, maybe 1 hour a day once it’s launched.

Brick and mortar businesses are going out of style. Brick and mortar businesses are expensive as well ($50k for a food truck with no guarantee of success!!) If you want to make it big, you have to leverage your network and the reach of the internet.

I’ll give you a few business ideas that cost less than $200 to start. Most are built around creating content and building an audience. Content creation is a great way to start a business. Essentially, build an audience, then monetize. I will also list a few others.

  • Blog (less than $50 for domain name and 12 months of hosting fees)
    • Start writing unique content on a specific niche and you will build an audience. Over time, you can add ads, affiliate links, products, coaching courses, etc. to your blog. Since you already have an audience, they will be open to buying.
  • Social Media Sites: Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Facebook (free)
    • Why not utilize a platform that already has millions of users? You can create an account on any of these platforms and start building a business this way.
    • I watch a lot of YouTube videos and it’s crazy how people can make a living off creating videos.
    • One downside of these platforms is if they change their algorithm or pay-out structure, then you may lose out on views, ad revenue, etc.
  • Consulting or Coaching (Free, but will take time to build a client book and reputation)
    • Are you an expert in a certain field? You can contract for and consult clients for a solid hourly wage. It’s a fun job and if you can communicate well, it would be a solid role for you.
  • Digital Product Creation (think e-book or how-to-guide, Free)
    • Creating a e-book on an area you are passionate about and sell it for a few bucks. The only time you spend is upfront, after that, it’s passive income.

It’s a great strategy these days to leverage the internet’s wide reach. There is so much money in the world right now… we just need to go and get it.

About me

I’m Angie! I was married for 13 years and I have two children from the marriage, I gave birth to our beautiful daughter, Gabrielle and our son Anthony. My children are karate instructors and I am very proud of them.

I am now 51 and although I was born and raised in Haiti, I now reside in the United States. I went to high school in NYC and my mother wanted my siblings and me to have a better life, so we moved to New Jersey!

My son Anthony Diaz-Cervo has a vlog channel on YouTube where he shares parts of his life, and my daughter has a blog www.fiercelybeautifulblog.com. I wanted my own creative outlet to express myself. With that being said, I originally started blogging for the karate school I had with my then husband, beginning of 1996 as somewhat of a hobby because I simply love to write.

I’ve always had an entrepreneurial attitude and love owning something of my own. This blog has become so much more than a hobby to me, I’ve been fortunate enough to pursue this as my growing career, one I have always dreamed of.

I have so many interests; motherhood, parenting, fashion, writing, self-development and so much more which is why I chose my name to use as my blog title. I thought for months, “what kind of title represents me?” and I just couldn’t think of anything more fitting than my own name.

I am a go with the flow type of gal with a passion for creating. I am always looking for fun, exciting opportunities to work with brands and companies to create great content together!

Making Your Life Golden

SABON“>Sabon

By Mark Ford

I have always been a strong opponent of television. But, K and I recently started watching it together. Just a little bit here and there; enough to get me thinking about the way people spend their recreational time.

It made me wonder if the kind of activities we engage in during our down time really makes a difference.

I’ve also pointed out that the more time you spend working, the more successful you’re likely to be – but acknowledge that even the most ambitious and hardest workers need to take at least a few hours out of the day to do something that gives them pleasure.

Something that doesn’t work.

The question then becomes, “What should that ‘something’ be?”

As I said, just about any activity we choose to do can fit into one of three categories. It can:

  • Damage us in some way
  • Improve us somehow
  • Leave us more or less the same

Think of the best choices – the ones that improve you – as Golden.

Think of the neutral choices – the ones that just help you pass the time – as Vaporous.

And think of the worst choices – the ones that hurt you – as Acidic.

It’s up to you how much Gold, Vapor, and Acid you are going to have in your life.

When I think of my own choices – good, bad, and neutral – I notice that they have the following characteristics:

Golden Choices

My best experiences tend to be with activities that are intellectually challenging and emotionally engaging. Because they demand a lot from me, I shy away from them when I am low in energy. But when I do get into them, they build my energy and thus make it easier to continue. When I am through with such an activity, I feel good about myself and content with how I have spent my time.

Vaporous Choices

These activities are easy to slip into and easier, too, to stay involved with. They are the choices we make when we don’t feel like making choices. The time we spend when we don’t much care how we spend our time. Welcome to the Vapor zone, the neutral, happy world of poker and sitcoms and gossip.

When I’m ready for some relaxation, my first impulse is always to choose a Vaporous activity. Having “worked hard all day,” I want something simple and mindless so I can gear down. And most people would probably say the same thing. Getting into the Vapor zone is easy – and staying there is easier still.

The big problem with Vaporous activities – and this is a very big problem for me – is that they leave me feeling enervated instead of energized. And empty. Vaporous activities do for me what Vaporous foods (i.e., comfort foods) do: They fill me up but tire me out.

Acidic Choices

Everybody has vices. At one time or another, I’ve had just about all of them. I have never smoked crack, but I’ve done plenty of other things to destroy, reduce, or disable myself.

Why I do these things, I can only guess. Sometimes I think I need the challenge of surviving self-imposed obstacles. Whatever my reasons, the result of making those choices is generally the same.

I get a dull pleasure that is mixed with a barely discernible level of pain. Even when the pleasure is intense, it is clouded by a foggy brain. It feels like I’m having a great time … but I am not sure. And if the actual experience of Acidic activities is mixed, the feeling afterward is not at all ambivalent. It is bad.

The interesting thing about Acidic options is how attractive they can be. Nobody would argue that they are good choices. We pick them because we are too weak to pick anything else, and we use what little mind we have left to rationalize our self-destruction.

Let’s Take a Closer Look at These 3 Categories

… Continue reading