A Guide to Postmortem Parenting

A Guide to Postmortem Parenting
by Will Bonner

If you want to use your money to hold influence over your children’s lives after yours has
ended, then this essay might be of interest…
Maurice Laboz, a Manhattan real estate mogul,
died recently, leaving $20 million to his two
daughters.
His will is an interesting case study in
postmortem parenting…
The girls — Marlena, 21; and Victoria, 17 —
will inherit $10 million each when they turn 35.
But they can get some of that money sooner if
they meet certain conditions set by their departed
father.
Here are the terms according to the New York Post:
• Marlena will get $500,000 for tying the knot,
but only if her husband signs a sworn statement
promising to keep his hands off the cash.
• She nets another $750,000 if she graduates
“from an accredited university” and writes
“100 words or less describing what she intends
to do with the funds” — with the trustees
appointed by her dad to oversee her money
responsible for approving her essay.
• Both daughters get a big incentive to earn
decent salaries by 2020. Each young woman
is guaranteed to receive an annual payout of
three times the income listed on their personal
federal tax return. In a not-so-subtle nod
to the taxman, their checks will be cut every
April 15.
• If the daughters have kids and don’t work
outside the house, the trustees will give them
each 3 percent of the value of their trust
every Jan. 1. There’s one catch: The money
flows only for a “child born in wedlock.”
• The sisters could earn the same amount being
“a caregiver” to their mother, Ewa Laboz,
58, whom their father was in the middle of
divorcing. She got nothing in the will and
has indicated that she will contest it.
On the face of it, these conditions are perfectly
reasonable. And it seems that the girls will get
their $10 million when they turn 35, whether they
comply with these terms or not.
But the marriage and college graduation
incentives apply only to the older daughter,
Marlena. It seems the younger daughter’s marriage
and college education are not subject to the same
terms, meaning she is not in line for these specific
monetary rewards.
Perceived inequality, even regarding some
minor thing, is big trouble when it comes to
inheritance issues.
But successful, type-A wealth creators are used
to getting their way. In death, as in life, they won’t
hesitate to punish the people, including family
members, who they feel wronged them and reward
their favorites…
Maurice Laboz did not offer equal incentives
to both girls.
Didn’t he want the same positive outcome
for both his daughters? Did he favor one girl
over the other? Or did one of them need more
encouragement than the other? The girls will
probably be asking those questions their entire lives.

to be continued

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