Category Archives: health

Angie Diaz-Cervo

My name is Angie Diaz-Cervo and I was born on the 18th of November, 1965 in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. I am the daughter of Haitian/Cuban sailor Anthony Salomon of Les Cayes and of Ghislene Moise of Benet, Haiti a seamstress. I am also the mother of two teenagers. The Salomon descent from Haitian President Lysius Felicite Salomon and The Diaz-Cervo family has a long, established history in New Jersey, dating back to 1996. My father died at the age of 43 in 1972 from pneumonia, which was also the likely result from a cold he caught overseas. I had a happy, normal childhood as an older child, leaving me somewhat spoiled. My mom remarried after ten years and her last husband was Andre, he became a big part of my life and I maintained close contact with him until his death in 2014. Growing up without my birth father impact me greatly and left me with an issue of abandonment and low self-esteem. I got over being timid by being a runway model for different Colleges and Church. My mother left to make a better life for us in the USA, her older brother Elias Moise came to the USA with a company and they give him the opportunity to get his green card, then after five years in America he became an American Citizen which gave him the advantage to sent for his brothers and sisters to come to the USA. Each of them worked hard for five years and became American Citizen. My mother worked hard for me to have the best education at the prestigious Gerard Gourge Preparatory School. I migrated to the states at the early age of fifteen with her three sisters Rith, Marthe, Dany  and three brothers Abraham, Remps and Antoine. I continued on to Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn, NY then attended Essex County College and St. Peter’s College where I graduated in 1991, with an AAS in Arts and science. My working career started as a sales person at Valley Fair then I worked at Food town, Karen’s Curtain, Burger Kings when I was still in High School. After I earned an associate degree in Arts and Science and get my license in Radiology Technology after graduation I worked at Christ Hospital in Jersey City, New Jersey for two years and Union Hospital in Union, New Jersey for seven years. I also worked for Dr. Botwin and Innella for about one year part-time. While working in the operating room at Christ hospital a nurse mentioned to me that my neck was too big and I should go see an Endocrinologist. I found out that I had hyperthyroidism; I understood that was the reasons for my fatigue, sweaty feet, palpitation and mood swing. Soon after I met my ex-husband Jose Diaz-Cervo at Union Hospital in the Radiology Department, both of us worked there. Jose and I got married in 1995; I became the mother of his two children Daniel 4 1/2 and Kassandra 2 1/2 years old from a previous marriage. Due to complication from my thyroid surgery, I was informing by my doctor that I may not be able to have children. Eventually, Jose Diaz-Cervo and I have two children of our own. Prior to that, he and I had a partnership with Bushido Karate in East Hanover. In 1996, while working for Union Hospital, I became a businesswoman by co-founding DiCervo’s Inc/Kingdom Karate World Group LLC. which expand into several facilities and many black belts? With hard work and an impeccable work ethic, I quickly propelled DiCervo’s Inc into a thriving business. My intimate knowledge of the business community and geography of New Jersey make me one of the most qualified Program Director. We owned vending routes in New Jersey for about two years then we sold the route to run the Karate school full-time. I established and maintained positive relationships with parents, and students. I helped to establish expansion into several locations by recruited as many as 30 new clients per month. I developed and managed working staffs and graduated several black belts. I helped the team to generated sales per month and developed and implemented plans to encourage student participation. I implement and managed the development and maintenance of Summer Camp at the center. I carried out weekly treatment meeting and ensured clients are progressing. I did advertising and social Media outreach on networks such as Facebook, Twitter, etc. I promoted private sales & monthly events. I build relationships with bloggers & online publishers. I used database management to track social media & marketing progress. I implemented various projects related to merchandising & items processing. A friend of my ex-husband recruited him in a financial business and as his wife, I had to get involved somehow to work as a team. We worked hard days and late nights to propel in the business. We got promoted to Regional Vice-President in Primerica in 2004. In 2006 life became unbearable for me, my marriage was falling apart, my health deteriorated with hemorrhage. I used my knowledge in the field to develop my skills as a Haitian-American author. My first book entitled My Grateful Book from Dorrance Publishing is a direct result of my hard work as well as life experiences. Unfortunately, I got divorced after thirteen of marriage and it was not a friendly separation. I share my passion for writing by blogging about certain topics and issues which have an impact on my social life. In my leisure time, some of my activities include fashion, traveling, reading and writing as well as staying fit. I am a social butterfly. To reach my goal I have a set time to start the assignment around a learning environment, therefore, the distractions will be minimal. I am committed to managing my time so I can achieve the great result. I believe that I can succeed and overcome the obstacles in my life. I used my phone calendar to keep track of schedule events and it sent me reminders. After my divorce and illness from the thyroid disorder, I now work as an ABA paraprofessional and substitute teacher for special needs children. My success comes naturally from my creativity, a passion for people and my personality described as a social butterfly. I wear different hats in my life because my life is dividing into several categories. I am a creative person and my friend advised me that I work well under pressure. I enjoy the chaos in my life most of the time. I m comfortable being a mother and I am successful at it. I was well connected in the business community, I instilled confidence in people, and they knew they will always get a straight answer from me. In December 2009, I got divorced from my husband of fourteen years and the corporation. My next journey continues with blogging at Fan box then I became a success coach there, however, the company changed policy which made it more like a credit card company. I also work as a substitute teacher and currently continuing my education at the University Of Phoenix. Over 6 years ago, I had a catalyst event that transformed my life. Although it took me some time to come to grips with some of the challenges I was faced with at the time, I realized that I love people; and making a positive difference in their lives is where I get my rewards and satisfaction. I’ve had wonderful opportunities to meet and maintain friendships with some of the most educated and wonderful people. Time and time again, I’m taught that wisdom, understanding, empowerment, commitment and success come from the passion for you and the people in our lives. I wear different hats in my life because my life is dividing into several categories. I am a creative person and my friend advised me that I work well under pressure. I enjoy the chaos in my life most of the time. I m comfortable being a mother, and an ABA paraprofessional and I am successful at it. I will close out this autobiography with the most important thing in my life, my children, and my family. I am in a relationship with a wonderful man and we plan on getting married in two years. I cannot have any more children but we can adopt or be foster parents if we like.

Trauma

I would not wish what happened to me on my worst enemies, however, the trauma saved my life. For years, I had a fibroid and each time I got pregnant, the fibroid protruded outside of my vagina. Or my third trimester I had to stop working because the fibroid got to big, after I gave birth to each of my kids, the fibroid went internally. Since it was my last trimester, I was not able to get it removed. As my menstrual came each month after my children, I bled heavily and my blood count dip so low I became anemic. I had to get iron injection every morning for two weeks while I took a class to get me back on my feet financially. I learned that I can use my credits from college to get a job as a substitute teacher and after one year the board of education gave me a contract to work with special needs children. The contract came with a membership of the Union for teachers which I get life insurance, ten sick days, three personal days, pension and the connection to enrolled with the teachers the Credit Union. I cashed out my pension from Union hospital to pay my rent the year before. I had to go to court before I had a hysterectomy and I put the check in the bank then asked my friend Linda to drop the rent money at the courthouse for me because I was in the hospital. I had surgery the Thanksgiving weekend and get a contract with the board of education six weeks later TYG.
I have tried different things to keep my spirit up and some are not aligned with my faith but God knew my heart was always in the right place. If I did not go through the pain of the trauma, I would off keep doing the same things I was doing for years, which was put myself in the end while I took care of a husband, business and still being a mom to four children.

u may have heard the phrase: “French women don’t get fat.” Frankly, I find it abrupt and provocative, but the truth is, it’s true. In fact, most Europeans enjoy a nice silhouette, so they must be doing something right (Read on to find out what). Don’t worry; I know their tricks. I spent about half of my life in Europe before coming to this great country and eventually becoming a proud American. Today, it just so happens that I received the following email from a reader, so this is my chance to unveil the secrets. “Hello Chef, I purchased your Eat More Burn More cookbook and have made several delicious meals from it! I still don’t understand how European women can stay thin when they eat croissants, pasta, bread, etc… all the time! Unless, they make these things with the adjustments you suggest. And what about eating out?? Our family will be spending 2.5 weeks in Italy this month — eating in restaurants often!! Any advice at how we can successfully do this? How do I get around the croissant breakfasts and pasta??? Thank you!” — Lorine Answer: Great questions, Lorine. You see, the more I spend time in the US, the more I understand the cultural differences between the US and Europe, as they relate to nutrition, exercise, and healthy eating. How do European women keep their figure? Well, first, things are changing and the adoption of an American lifestyle by Europeans makes things a little harder for them. Nonetheless, there are details in their lifestyle that make a big difference I think. Here they are: Soft exercise is one of them (you walk everywhere in Europe). Having longer meals and taking the time to enjoy, and have conversations at the dinner table. That also makes a difference (digestion takes more time, which helps). The portions are smaller. The food is more authentic and healthier as a general rule (less processed foods). Europeans eat more fiber (more veggies, more nuts, seeds, less empty calories). Pastries and sweets are usually enjoyed at the end of the meal. Less fast food. All this makes a huge difference. It makes the difference. Lorine, I’ll be surprised if your family gains weight during your trip to Italy. Please let me know when you get back. I bet you’ll be all fine. Enjoy your trip, live like an Italian (enjoy the small portion of pasta as an “appetizer,” walk everywhere, eat what the locals put in front of you, have a glass of red wine daily, chit chat with your hosts…), and don’t worry so much about gaining weight. In my experience, when my US relatives visit my family in France, they actually lose weight! The food there is actually much more fiber oriented, with less empty calories and less sugar. And that is exactly what I promote in my book Eat More, Burn More. Have a good trip and let me know if I’m right. :)

By Gui Alinat

You may have heard the phrase: “French women don’t get fat.” Frankly, I find it abrupt and provocative, but the truth is, it’s true.

In fact, most Europeans enjoy a nice silhouette, so they must be doing something right (Read on to find out what).

Don’t worry; I know their tricks. I spent about half of my life in Europe before coming to this great country and eventually becoming a proud American.

Today, it just so happens that I received the following email from a reader, so this is my chance to unveil the secrets.

“Hello Chef,
I purchased your Eat More Burn More cookbook and have made several delicious meals from it! I still don’t understand how European women can stay thin when they eat croissants, pasta, bread, etc… all the time! Unless, they make these things with the adjustments you suggest. And what about eating out?? Our family will be spending 2.5 weeks in Italy this month — eating in restaurants often!! Any advice at how we can successfully do this? How do I get around the croissant breakfasts and pasta??? Thank you!”
— Lorine

Answer:
Great questions, Lorine.

You see, the more I spend time in the US, the more I understand the cultural differences between the US and Europe, as they relate to nutrition, exercise, and healthy eating.

How do European women keep their figure? Well, first, things are changing and the adoption of an American lifestyle by Europeans makes things a little harder for them. Nonetheless, there are details in their lifestyle that make a big difference I think.

Here they are:

  1. Soft exercise is one of them (you walk everywhere in Europe).
  2. Having longer meals and taking the time to enjoy, and have conversations at the dinner table.
    That also makes a difference (digestion takes more time, which helps).
  3. The portions are smaller.
  4. The food is more authentic and healthier as a general rule (less processed foods).
  5. Europeans eat more fiber (more veggies, more nuts, seeds, less empty calories).
  6. Pastries and sweets are usually enjoyed at the end of the meal.
  7. Less fast food.

All this makes a huge difference. It makes the difference.

Lorine, I’ll be surprised if your family gains weight during your trip to Italy. Please let me know when you get back. I bet you’ll be all fine. Enjoy your trip, live like an Italian (enjoy the small portion of pasta as an “appetizer,” walk everywhere, eat what the locals put in front of you, have a glass of red wine daily, chit chat with your hosts…), and don’t worry so much about gaining weight.

In my experience, when my US relatives visit my family in France, they actually lose weight! The food there is actually much more fiber oriented, with less empty calories and less sugar. And that is exactly what I promote in my book Eat More, Burn More.

Have a good trip and let me know if I’m right. 🙂

I Tried to Quit But It’s Too Hard!

I Tried to Quit But It’s Too Hard!

By Leo Babauta

You might have uttered these defeated words before, “I tried to quit but it’s too hard!” I did many times when I tried to quit smoking. And when I tried giving up meat, cheese, sugar, and more.

Quitting something can seem – and is – often incredibly hard, so much so that we don’t even want to put ourselves through the suffering.

Have you tried giving up alcohol? Marijuana? Biting your nails? Complaining? Cigarettes? Junk food?

I can confirm that it’s hard to quit an addiction, because there are several things that stand in our way:

  1. The physical addiction — This is difficult, but it often lasts only a few days. Fortunately, I can tell you that if you really put your mind to it, you can do anything for a few days at a time.
  2. The reliance on it as a coping mechanism — We’re so used to using the addiction as a crutch when we’re stressed or sad or things are difficult or we need to socialize. Fortunately, there are plenty of other healthier ways to cope with stress.
  3. You don’t believe you can do it. This is the worst one, because if you give in to this obstacle, the other two are not conquerable. Fortunately, this one is entirely under your control.

Because it’s so important, we’re going to focus on the last obstacle first.

You Think You Can’t

You’ve heard of the Little Engine That Could … well, our brains are the opposite. They’re the little engines that think they can’t.

Our brain is amazing at rationalizing why we can’t do something.

Just try giving up something that you rely on (this is what my Year of Living Without is about). At first, you might start to think, “This isn’t too bad … in fact, I’m kinda excited about it!”

But then, when things get a bit difficult, your mind shouts, “This is too hard! I can’t do it! I want to give up!” That makes you start to ask, “Why am I doing this to myself? Life is too short to suffer so much.” And then you give in, “Just once, one little time, it won’t matter. No one will know. One exception won’t hurt anything. It’s the long run that matters.”

Of course, the big problem is that the one exception does hurt. It leads you to the same rationalization the next time (“One more time won’t hurt”) and then in your mind, you’re not quitting anymore.

Our minds get in our way.

So what can we do? Well, luckily this is entirely fixable. We just have to do two things. First, we must examine our beliefs, and second, we must change them.

Yes, our beliefs are changeable. I know because I’ve changed numerous beliefs, and tested those new beliefs with self-experiments, and found the new ones to be true. The old beliefs will be true, too, if you believe them. Experience will bear out the beliefs getting in your way, if you believe them. But experience can prove better beliefs to be true too, if you’re willing to give them a try.

Let’s take some examples of beliefs that stand in our way:

  • Old belief: I’m a smoker who is trying to quit but it’s hard.
    New belief: I don’t smoke. I’m a non-smoker. It’s who I am. (Change your self-identity.)
  • Old belief: I can’t do it if it’s too hard.
    New belief: I’ve done hard things before. I can do this if it’s hard. In fact, I’ll take it as a personal challenge.
  • Old belief: It won’t hurt to do it just once.
    New belief: It will hurt my trust in myself, which is more important to me than some momentary pleasure.
  • Old belief: I need my ___ (cigarette, beer, meat, cheese, sweets).
    New belief: I don’t need it. It’s unnecessary and causing me harm.
  • Old belief: I have a complicated emotional past with food and can’t do it.
    New belief: I can focus on the moment, instead of the past. I have the power to decide what goes in my mouth. It’s not complicated, it’s simple — one step at a time.
  • Old belief: This makes me feel better (comforted, pleasured, joy, etc).
    New belief: It actually makes me feel worse. I don’t want to do that to myself. I’m going to love myself by doing things that are better for me.

These are only examples — there may be numerous other beliefs that you have about the issue of quitting. But you can’t change them if you don’t know they’re there. Pay attention to what you’re saying to yourself, examine your beliefs, and hold them lightly. They aren’t necessarily true — and in fact, I don’t believe they’re true at all.

It’s simply the scared child in you wanting to be comforted.

The Physical Addiction

The suffering of withdrawing from physical addiction really only lasts a few days. I’ve seen it with alcohol and drug addiction (in others close to me) and I’ve gone through it with cigarettes. It’s a tough time.

But do you know what’s tougher? Going through pregnancy and labor (based on helping my wife through those), running a marathon or ultramarathon or doing some other physical challenge. Starting your own business or going on stage or cramming for the bar exam or going through a tough disease or helping a loved one who is dying or raising a child.

These are things many of us have done — not all of them, but perhaps one or two. And if you haven’t done these things, you’ve done other hard things. Hard things aren’t things to be dreaded. We can make it through them, and be stronger and better off having done it.

Some tips to get you through a hard few days of overcoming physical addiction:

  • Be accountable. Tell others you’re doing it, and ask them to hold you accountable. Just telling them won’t get you through it, but knowing they’re watching and checking on you and encouraging you will.
  • Have support. Ask a few close friends to support you. Call on them when you get strong urges. Ask for their help. Lean on them.
  • Distract yourself. Keep yourself busy. Don’t dwell on the suffering. Do stuff.
  • Create your environment. Get rid of the cigarettes or sugar. Don’t go out with friends if you’re trying to quit alcohol or cigarettes or junk food — just for a few days. Stock up on healthy stuff. Make your environment friendly to your change.
  • Get good at getting through an urge. An urge isn’t an absolute command. It’s an itch. You can overcome it. Watch the urge, let it rise, and know that it will pass in a minute. Get through it. Then you’re good.

Find the strategies that work for you, but you can do it.

Your Coping Mechanism

One of the biggest problems with quitting an addiction is that you use it to cope with real problems. When you are stressed, or sick, or sad, or depressed, or going through a crisis, or lonely, or need to socialize in an uncomfortable situation … you use the addiction to cope.

But it’s only a crutch. You can cope without it. You just need to find new strategies.

A few strategies for coping that might help:

  • Stress: I’ve learned to use exercise, meditation, and simplifying as ways to cope with stress. Going for a run or a walk have helped me tremendously. Talking to other people about your stressful problems also help. So does a mindful cup of tea.
  • Sad: When I’m sad, I find things in my life to be grateful for. I connect with loved ones. I acknowledge my feelings and realize that it’s OK to be sad sometimes — it reminds you that you’re human. Then I take action and find something I’m passionate about.
  • Lonely: Actually, while most people would seek the company of others (which isn’t a bad idea), I like to learn to keep myself company. I’m great company when I want to be — I play, I imagine, I write and read and meditate and learn.
  • Crisis: When there’s a crisis, does leaning on an unhealthy addiction actually make it better? Only in that it gives you a temporary reprieve (going out to have a smoke or a drink) or temporary pleasure (having a cupcake or soda). They don’t take care of the problem, and can actually make it worse (try solving a crisis while inebriated). Instead, allow yourself the reprieve without the addiction — take a walk or meditate. Getting away from the crisis, even for a few minutes, can give you a breather and some perspective. Then figure out what you can do, let go of what you can’t control, and take one action.
  • Need to socialize: Often we use smoking or drinking or eating as ways to lubricate awkward social situations. But they’re just crutches — you can actually do without them and get stronger without them. You can socialize without these things — try it once and see. You’ll get better at socializing if you do without the crutches.
  • Sick: Unhealthy addictions don’t help you when you’re sick. Shoveling junk food into your face when you’re sick (I’ve done it many times) might make you feel comforted, but you aren’t doing your health any favors. Instead, nurture yourself. Give yourself some healthier food to fuel the healing process. Give yourself a rest, and a hug.

ABA Paraprofessional

ABA paraprofessional in early intervention for special needs children focuses on getting the children to learn life skills in order to be part of the society and curve some of the behaviors. The process start as soon as the child gets up from the bed, a regular routine is very important and any changes can upset the child. He or she can communicate what he or she needs, and what he or she is avoiding or seeking. For example: if I want one kind of student to learn the lessons, I need to know not to remove him or her from the items he or she has in his or her hands, instead, I need to cover the item with one hand and ask him or her the question I need him or her to answer. I implemented ABA special-education methods and have experiences with ABLLS-R assessment and test. I followed policies and regulations in keeping progress notes and student records, and in making the necessary reports. I demonstrated and reinforced social standards of behavior. I established norms of class behavior and maintained order at all times. I taught ONE OR MORE of these: English, math, social sciences, citizenship, art, music. I employed lecture, demonstration, and discussion teaching methods in the class. I Reinforced skills such as independence, problem-solving, and goal-setting. My job including that I ensure a clean and healthy classroom atmosphere by maintaining children’s proper hygiene and following proper diaper changing and potty training policies and procedures.
ABA paraprofessional needs to be dynamic, intelligent, patient and insightful. I am knowledgeable and respectful of my expertise, children with special needs. I worked with the family as an ABA paraprofessional before and after his daily school program. The student has ADHD with impulsivity and can be on the Autism Spectrum. One my many people skills is that I have a keen sense of knowing just when to “push” our student to get more out of him and when to “back off” still keeping students on task, making the best use of their time together. This is often not an easy task. I frequently implement strategies I learned in working with special needs children when my student needs them most. I bring in a nice mix of book, real world, and people knowledge that has been a great source of support for the student and his or her family. Parents cannot put a price tag on knowing their child is safe and happy while they are at work. I have afforded family security and the clear conscience that he is in great hands and well cared for. I must have a perfect attendance record and be prompt every day. Not everyone can work with special need children because you cannot focus on yourself, you need to have a caring heart.
In a classroom setting, I need to worry about my assign student ONLY unless someone needs or asks for assistance because it can become overwhelming with so many students and adults. My assign student needs to be with me at all times! If I am going to simply hang my coat and my student tends to wander or not sit still, I need to take their hand and let them walk with me. It only takes a second for someone to get hurt. If I need to use the restroom or take a moment for myself, I need to ask another adult to keep an eye on my assign student.
Throughout the day, especially during circle time and other instructional times, I must be cautious of how loud I am. The louder I am the louder the student will be. At circle time, I should be engaged with the student I am working with whether it is on the rug or at the table doing a writing activity. If my student is on the bus, it is my responsibility to go outside and get them. Once students are inside, they should sit with a table toy. http://www.amazon.com/dp/B013Z1SA7A/ref=cm_sw_r_tw_dp_tDM3vb1WJ8B2N via @amazon

Health Care Interview

Work with your personal physician and health care providers to keep the lines of communication open and provide the best care possible.•

Adapting to changes

Care of a woman with a suspected or diagnosed gynecologic cancer should be structured like the patient-centered medical home model and be coordinated by a single health care provider (a “team captain”) with multidisciplinary training in the care of women with gynecologic cancer.
• Measurable standards for high quality care for women diagnosed with gynecologic cancer should be determined, validated and tracked. Demonstration projects, registry systems and funding for outcomes-based research are key.
• Several payment systems, including diagnosis-based, episode-of-care reimbursement system in which payment would be based on each diagnostic episode of the woman’s illness rather than on specific procedures, should be developed and tested.

Education requirement

The characteristics necessary for a physician to develop into a successful gynecologic oncologist include an extensive fund of knowledge related to the subspecialties, strong interpersonal skills, and the ability to practice within the complex systems required for management of gynecologic cancer patients, surgical expertise, and the clinical ability to provide comprehensive oncologic care for these women. In order for a trainee to acquire these skills, a gynecologic oncology training program must accept only highly qualified individuals as fellows, have a dedicated core faculty, practice in a supportive environment that has appropriate facilities, and provide adequate clinical material. The gynecologic oncology training program must be organized with an emphasis on education of the fellows. Part of the educational program is formal (lectures, assigned reading, basic skill sets, etc.). Training in clinical and surgical skills is a day-to-day process that occurs during the course of patient care. One requirement of The American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ABOG) is that the fellow spends 12 months of protected time doing research. Fellows are also required to take 2 courses, one in biostatistics and one in cancer biology. A thesis of publishable quality is also required. All programs must perform ongoing quality assurance and reassessment of potential areas for improvement. ABOG is responsible for the accreditation and ongoing monitoring of the fellowship programs.

  • Taking a patient drug history
  • Performing the physical examination
  • Making a medical diagnosis
  • Prescribing appropriate drugs
  • Monitoring a patient’s responses to drugs
  • Modifying the drugs and drug dosages as necessary

Patrick S. Anderson, MD specializes in oncology. An oncologist is a medical doctor who is specifically trained to diagnose and treat cancer. Different types of cancer respond to different treatments, so oncologists must know which treatment is best. Some oncologists specialize in a particular type of cancer. Lung cancerprostate cancerrectal cancerpancreatic cancerbreast cancercervical cancerovarian cancer, and leukemia are examples of various types of cancer.

Patrick Anderson MD is general practitioner and obstetrician & gynecologist licensed to practice medicine in New York and New Jersey. Dr. Anderson specializes in general practice, obstetrics & gynecology, and gynecology oncology and practices medicine at Montefiore Medical Center in 1695 Eastchester Rd Ste L2, Bronx, at Jersey City Medical Center in 120 Irvington Ave, South Orange, and at Bronx Lebanon Ob./Gyn. Group in 1650 Grand Concourse Fl 14, Bronx.

A gynecologic oncologist is a physician/surgeon specializing in treating cancers of the female reproduction system, including ovarian, endometrial, vaginal, cervical and uterine cancer. Gynecologic oncologists are trained as obstetrician/gynecologists (OB-GYNs), and then receive additional training in female reproductive cancer and cancer treatment, including radiation therapy and surgery. These specialists perform biopsies and other surgeries, and are trained to prescribe noninvasive cancer treatments, including chemotherapy and radiation.

Obstetrics and gynecology

has more recently evolved as a primary care specialty for

categorical care for women, including obstetrics and/or gynecological

problems, with female patients going directly to ob–gyn

practitioners without referral.

Degree

MD

Medical School

UMDNJ

Specialties

Oncology Specialist (cancer) and Obstetrician & Gynecologist (OB/GYN)

Years of Experience

20

Languages

Spanish, French, Urdu

Dr. Anderson has 21 hospital affiliations:

  • Monmouth Medical Center
  • Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center Concourse Division Bronx, Bronx Borough
  • Medical Schools:
  • Umdnj–New Jersey Medical School
  • Graduated: 1988
  • Residency Hospital:
  • Albert Einstein College Of Medicine-Yeshiva University
  • Graduated: 1992
  • Fellowship Hospital:
  • Albert Einstein College Of Medicine-Yeshiva University
  • Graduated: 1995
  • Board Certified in Gynecological Oncology
  • Board Certified in Obstetrics & Gynecology
  • Licensed in New Jersey
  • Licensed in New York
  • Chemotherapy
  • Hysterectomy
  • Lumpectomy
  • Mastectomy
  • Ovarian Ablation
  • Robotic surgery is particularly well-suited to both of these procedures, thanks to its excellent visualization of the operating field and the fact that it enhances the ability of surgeons to perform the meticulous dissections required in these surgeries.
  • They work with the oncology team and other specialists like ARNPs and PAs to develop and treat women’s cancers. Interaction with others
  • A Board Certified gynecological oncologist, Dr. Anderson completed his obstetrics, gynecological residency and oncology fellowship at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and is a graduate of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Medical School.
  • Anderson has received awards and honors from national organizations such as the American Cancer Society and the American Institute of Chemistry and is an active researcher and teacher on a variety of subjects in his areas of expertise. He is a Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology and a full member of The Society of Gynecologic Oncologist has co-authored articles that have appeared in prestigious peer-reviewed medical journals such asGynecological Oncology, Journal of Radiation Oncology, Journal of Clinical Oncology and Journal of Women’s Health.

Robotics has changed the landscape of medicine with increasingly streamlined procedures, greater precision and optimal 3D viewing for surgeons and reduced pain and a faster recovery for patients.  The technology, combined with the skillful hand of the surgeon, has raised the standard of care for complex surgeries while affording patients dramatic benefits. The integration of computer-enhanced technology with the surgeon’s skill, robotic surgery enables surgeons to perform precise, minimally invasive surgery in a manner that enhances healing and promotes well-being.

To become a gynecologic oncologist, the candidate must first complete a bachelor’s degree from an accredited school. Many people find it easier to gain admittance to a good medical school with an undergraduate degree in one of the sciences, such as biology, chemistry, or physics. Most students discover it is much simpler to be admitted to medical school when their undergraduate history shows community service or activities in addition to excellent grades.

Before applying to medical school, students are normally required to take and pass medical admission test. These exams test the student’s knowledge in problem solving, science knowledge, as well as written and verbal communication skills. Without a passing score on these exams, the student may be unable to enroll in medical school.

The next step to become a gynecologic oncologist is to complete medical school. During the first two years basic medical subjects are studied, such as anatomy and physiology, biochemistry, and microbiology. The third year focuses on internal medicine, gynecology, and surgery. Electives and choosing a good residency program are both done during the fourth year. Another four years is spent learning, working, and practicing gynecologic medicine within the confines of a medical residency program.

After residency, the final step to become a gynecologic oncologist is to be accepted for and complete a fellowship in gynecologic oncology. These programs last for an additional three years of study, and it can be incredibly difficult to be accepted. During this time, doctors are expected to study an intensive program relating to the female reproductive system as well as the diagnosis and treatment of cancers. Following successful completion of the fellowship, a doctor is considered an expert in her field.

Gynecologic Oncologists are fully trained obstetrician/gynecologists who successfully complete an additional three to four years of intensive training in all aspects of gynecologic cancer care. They understand the pathology and biology of reproductive-tract cancers, and have the expertise to provide comprehensive treatment including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, symptom management and supportive care.

Read more: http://www.vitals.com/doctors/Dr_Patrick_S_Anderson.html#ixzz2OO17ha00

Work with your personal physician and health care providers to keep the lines of communication open and provide the best care possible.•

Adapting to changes

Care of a woman with a suspected or diagnosed gynecologic cancer should be structured like the patient-centered medical home model and be coordinated by a single health care provider (a “team captain”) with multidisciplinary training in the care of women with gynecologic cancer.
• Measurable standards for high quality care for women diagnosed with gynecologic cancer should be determined, validated and tracked. Demonstration projects, registry systems and funding for outcomes-based research are key.
• Several payment systems, including diagnosis-based, episode-of-care reimbursement system in which payment would be based on each diagnostic episode of the woman’s illness rather than on specific procedures, should be developed and tested.

Education requirement

The characteristics necessary for a physician to develop into a successful gynecologic oncologist include an extensive fund of knowledge related to the subspecialties, strong interpersonal skills, and the ability to practice within the complex systems required for management of gynecologic cancer patients, surgical expertise, and the clinical ability to provide comprehensive oncologic care for these women. In order for a trainee to acquire these skills, a gynecologic oncology training program must accept only highly qualified individuals as fellows, have a dedicated core faculty, practice in a supportive environment that has appropriate facilities, and provide adequate clinical material. The gynecologic oncology training program must be organized with an emphasis on education of the fellows. Part of the educational program is formal (lectures, assigned reading, basic skill sets, etc.). Training in clinical and surgical skills is a day-to-day process that occurs during the course of patient care. One requirement of The American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ABOG) is that the fellow spends 12 months of protected time doing research. Fellows are also required to take 2 courses, one in biostatistics and one in cancer biology. A thesis of publishable quality is also required. All programs must perform ongoing quality assurance and reassessment of potential areas for improvement. ABOG is responsible for the accreditation and ongoing monitoring of the fellowship programs.

  • Taking a patient drug history
  • Performing the physical examination
  • Making a medical diagnosis
  • Prescribing appropriate drugs
  • Monitoring a patient’s responses to drugs
  • Modifying the drugs and drug dosages as necessary

Patrick S. Anderson, MD specializes in oncology. An oncologist is a medical doctor who is specifically trained to diagnose and treat cancer. Different types of cancer respond to different treatments, so oncologists must know which treatment is best. Some oncologists specialize in a particular type of cancer. Lung cancerprostate cancerrectal cancerpancreatic cancerbreast cancercervical cancerovarian cancer, and leukemia are examples of various types of cancer.

Patrick Anderson MD is general practitioner and obstetrician & gynecologist licensed to practice medicine in New York and New Jersey. Dr. Anderson specializes in general practice, obstetrics & gynecology, and gynecology oncology and practices medicine at Montefiore Medical Center in 1695 Eastchester Rd Ste L2, Bronx, at Jersey City Medical Center in 120 Irvington Ave, South Orange, and at Bronx Lebanon Ob./Gyn. Group in 1650 Grand Concourse Fl 14, Bronx.

A gynecologic oncologist is a physician/surgeon specializing in treating cancers of the female reproduction system, including ovarian, endometrial, vaginal, cervical and uterine cancer. Gynecologic oncologists are trained as obstetrician/gynecologists (OB-GYNs), and then receive additional training in female reproductive cancer and cancer treatment, including radiation therapy and surgery. These specialists perform biopsies and other surgeries, and are trained to prescribe noninvasive cancer treatments, including chemotherapy and radiation.

Obstetrics and gynecology

has more recently evolved as a primary care specialty for

categorical care for women, including obstetrics and/or gynecological

problems, with female patients going directly to ob–gyn

practitioners without referral.

Degree

MD

Medical School

UMDNJ

Specialties

Oncology Specialist (cancer) and Obstetrician & Gynecologist (OB/GYN)

Years of Experience

20

Languages

Spanish, French, Urdu

Dr. Anderson has 21 hospital affiliations:

  • Monmouth Medical Center
  • Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center Concourse Division Bronx, Bronx Borough
  • Medical Schools:
  • Umdnj–New Jersey Medical School
  • Graduated: 1988
  • Residency Hospital:
  • Albert Einstein College Of Medicine-Yeshiva University
  • Graduated: 1992
  • Fellowship Hospital:
  • Albert Einstein College Of Medicine-Yeshiva University
  • Graduated: 1995
  • Board Certified in Gynecological Oncology
  • Board Certified in Obstetrics & Gynecology
  • Licensed in New Jersey
  • Licensed in New York
  • Chemotherapy
  • Hysterectomy
  • Lumpectomy
  • Mastectomy
  • Ovarian Ablation
  • Robotic surgery is particularly well-suited to both of these procedures, thanks to its excellent visualization of the operating field and the fact that it enhances the ability of surgeons to perform the meticulous dissections required in these surgeries.
  • They work with the oncology team and other specialists like ARNPs and PAs to develop and treat women’s cancers. Interaction with others
  • A Board Certified gynecological oncologist, Dr. Anderson completed his obstetrics, gynecological residency and oncology fellowship at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and is a graduate of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Medical School.
  • Anderson has received awards and honors from national organizations such as the American Cancer Society and the American Institute of Chemistry and is an active researcher and teacher on a variety of subjects in his areas of expertise. He is a Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology and a full member of The Society of Gynecologic Oncologist has co-authored articles that have appeared in prestigious peer-reviewed medical journals such asGynecological Oncology, Journal of Radiation Oncology, Journal of Clinical Oncology and Journal of Women’s Health.

Robotics has changed the landscape of medicine with increasingly streamlined procedures, greater precision and optimal 3D viewing for surgeons and reduced pain and a faster recovery for patients.  The technology, combined with the skillful hand of the surgeon, has raised the standard of care for complex surgeries while affording patients dramatic benefits. The integration of computer-enhanced technology with the surgeon’s skill, robotic surgery enables surgeons to perform precise, minimally invasive surgery in a manner that enhances healing and promotes well-being.

To become a gynecologic oncologist, the candidate must first complete a bachelor’s degree from an accredited school. Many people find it easier to gain admittance to a good medical school with an undergraduate degree in one of the sciences, such as biology, chemistry, or physics. Most students discover it is much simpler to be admitted to medical school when their undergraduate history shows community service or activities in addition to excellent grades.

Before applying to medical school, students are normally required to take and pass medical admission test. These exams test the student’s knowledge in problem solving, science knowledge, as well as written and verbal communication skills. Without a passing score on these exams, the student may be unable to enroll in medical school.

The next step to become a gynecologic oncologist is to complete medical school. During the first two years basic medical subjects are studied, such as anatomy and physiology, biochemistry, and microbiology. The third year focuses on internal medicine, gynecology, and surgery. Electives and choosing a good residency program are both done during the fourth year. Another four years is spent learning, working, and practicing gynecologic medicine within the confines of a medical residency program.

After residency, the final step to become a gynecologic oncologist is to be accepted for and complete a fellowship in gynecologic oncology. These programs last for an additional three years of study, and it can be incredibly difficult to be accepted. During this time, doctors are expected to study an intensive program relating to the female reproductive system as well as the diagnosis and treatment of cancers. Following successful completion of the fellowship, a doctor is considered an expert in her field.

Gynecologic Oncologists are fully trained obstetrician/gynecologists who successfully complete an additional three to four years of intensive training in all aspects of gynecologic cancer care. They understand the pathology and biology of reproductive-tract cancers, and have the expertise to provide comprehensive treatment including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, symptom management and supportive care.

Read more: http://www.vitals.com/doctors/Dr_Patrick_S_Anderson.html#ixzz2OO17ha00

Electronic Health Records

Management and health care professionals decide which electronic health records system is best suited for them. It must be effective and useful with the organization’s mission and vision. It needs to be up to par with the HIPAA privacy and security regulations. They must define what is the main purpose of the EHR system they are requiring. It makes it convenient from patients and clinicians to development. Electronic Health Records is the paperless type of patient’s medical information; it is upgrade by health care administration set up patient’s data which include medications, vital signs, past medical history, vaccinations, lab results, progress notes, and radiology results. It has the capacity to support different branches of health care. It reduces medical errors because of the accuracy, and clarity of medical information. It helps patients to make better decisions, and reduce repetition of tests and health information is ready faster.

Nurses can enter vitals of patients right away because the system is in the examination room. They can fix any errors such as medications names or if they forget to enter crucial information. Physicians go over test results and prescriptions new medications or manage previous medications; they can set up new appointments and test for patients. Administrations process schedules enter insurance information and can see if patients are approved for clinical trials or chronic disease management programs.
Electronic Health Records are covered under the HIPAA; they are safe and confidential because it deals with person’s health information. The doctors, medical office staff, health care provider and hospitals must have passwords. The HIPAA privacy rule gives federal protections for individual privacy concerning health information, and HIPAA security rule sets national standards that health care providers must abide for the security of electronic protected health information. “At the same time, the Privacy Rule is balanced so that it permits the disclEHRsosure of health information needed for patient care and other necessary purposes. “ (2014) HIPAA set up annual inspections of health care providers, and if they find privacy and security breach, they can penalize them. Some of violations of the Privacy rule might be punished by the department of justice as criminal prosecutions. Penalties are based on the date they occur, also were they mistakes of neglects; however, OCR is the department which notify entities of the penalties and give those opportunities to defend themselves.
EHR increase care for patients by being safe, reliable and reduce errors. It is useful to health care insurers, health care professionals and health care consumers. It reduce medical errors, decrease unnecessary tests and help patients to get better faster.

References:

Wager, K. A., Lee, F. W., & Glaser, J. P. (2009). Health care information systems: A practical approach for health care management (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

U .S. Department of Health and Human Services/ National Institutes of Health. Retrieved from http://www.privacyruleandresearch.nih.gov

Telemedecine

Telemedecine does not have the intimate engagement in person between doctors and the patients but it does keep the line of communication between the two just a far. Telemedecine is the new innovative technology that will bring healthcare to all remote areas for two main reasons.  First, Telemedecine engage patients and medical staff and also improve medical education in remote countries.  But most importantly, Telemedecine increases quality of care, convenience, cost and acceptability of this type of service improve education in remote areas.