Category Archives: Salomon

Why Rich People Hate Trump


From Bill Bonner, chairman, Bonner & Partners: It’s back to Europe. Back to school. Back to work.

Let’s begin by bringing new readers into the discussion… and by reminding old readers (and ourselves) where we stand.

Small and Lonely Group

As a Diary reader, you join a small and lonely group.

But we know something others don’t.

We—and apparently only we—understand the real cause of our economic malaise.
What malaise, you ask?

Well… how could the richest, most technologically advanced, and most scientifically sophisticated economy stop dead in its tracks?

The rate of economic growth has gone steadily downhill for the last 30 years. By some measures, after accounting for the effects of inflation, we’re back to levels not seen since before the Industrial Revolution.

And how could such a modern, 21st-century economy make the average person poorer?

When you measure actual inflation, rather than the government’s crooked numbers, the median U.S. household income is 20% lower today than when the century began.

And why would our modern economy concentrate wealth in the hands of so few, so that only the richest 1% make any real progress?

You may also ask a question with an obvious answer: Why are the richest and most powerful people in the country overwhelmingly supporting Ms. Clinton in the presidential race?

You find the answer to all these questions the same way: Follow the money.

Record Haul

Ms. Clinton is raising record amounts of money—$80 million in a single month.

Big corporations, banks, military contractors, rich people—all are pitching in to make sure Hillary is our next president.

Why?

Because she promises to protect the status quo.

That, of course, is what government always does. A free economy is a precarious place for wealth. It is despised by nearly everyone—especially the rich.

In a truly free market, the process of “creative destruction” can’t be controlled. New wealth is born. Old wealth dies.

Naturally, people with wealth and power try to use government to get more wealth and power… and to stop the creative-destructive process. They want to protect what they’ve got already. That’s why the real role of government is to look into the future and keep it from happening.

Hillary stands like King Canute, promising to stop the tides of economic history.

What’s this got to do with money?

Let’s ask another question instead: What is the source of Ms. Clinton’s campaign pile? Whence cometh all this lucre?

“It comes from rich people,” you will say.

But where did the rich get so much money?

Ah… that’s where it gets interesting.

We remind you of the context: So far this century, only the rich have gotten wealthier. Naturally, they are keen to see the system that gave them—and them alone—such great wealth continue.

Old Money, New Money

The key to understanding it all is the money system itself.

The money you spend today is the money that President Nixon inaugurated on August 15, 1971.

That’s when he reneged on America’s promise to convert foreign creditors’ dollars to gold at a fixed price of $35 per ounce… and broke the last link between the dollar and gold.

Nixon’s new money looked, for all the world, like the old money. It seemed to work just like the dollar always did. And the most distinguished economist of the era—Milton Friedman—advised Nixon to put it in place.
Subtle… slippery—the difference between the old dollar and the new one went unnoticed for 40 years.

Old dollar? New dollar? Who cared?

Even now, most of the world has no idea what happened. But we, dear reader, are beginning to connect the dots.

Here’s the basic difference: The old gold-backed dollar represented wealth that had already been created. You got more dollars as you created more wealth.

Money was real wealth.

But this old money was hard for the authorities to control. They said it was uncooperative. Intransient. And stubborn. They wanted a new kind of money… and a dollar they could manipulate (to make a better economy, of course).

So, the new dollar was created. And this new dollar was not based on wealth, but on debt.

It was not backed by gold. And it was not connected to the real wealth of the economy.
Instead, it was brought into being by the banking system—as a credit. It increased as people borrowed and went further into debt, not as they grew wealthier.

The more they borrowed, the more they could buy. This gave the economy the appearance of growth and prosperity. It allowed millions of Americans to increase their standard of living, even as their salaries stalled.

But every purchase put people further into debt…

Between 1964 and 2007, credit expanded 50 times.

And in 2008, the credit bubble burst.

More to come…

Reeves’ Note: The big corporations, banks, military contractors, and rich people backing Hillary Clinton are just apparatchiks of what Bill calls the Deep State… a nebulous group of elites who have infiltrated the far reaches of the American government.

Bill exposes this unelected group of insiders, and offers a “prep guide” to protect your wealth and privacy from its intrusion… in this urgent warning.

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Angie Diaz-Cervo

My name is Angie Diaz-Cervo and I was born on the 18th of November, 1965 in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. I am the daughter of Haitian/Cuban sailor Anthony Salomon of Les Cayes and of Ghislene Moise of Benet, Haiti a seamstress. I am also the mother of two teenagers. The Salomon descent from Haitian President Lysius Felicite Salomon and The Diaz-Cervo family has a long, established history in New Jersey, dating back to 1996. My father died at the age of 43 in 1972 from pneumonia, which was also the likely result from a cold he caught overseas. I had a happy, normal childhood as an older child, leaving me somewhat spoiled. My mom remarried after ten years and her last husband was Andre, he became a big part of my life and I maintained close contact with him until his death in 2014. Growing up without my birth father impact me greatly and left me with an issue of abandonment and low self-esteem. I got over being timid by being a runway model for different Colleges and Church. My mother left to make a better life for us in the USA, her older brother Elias Moise came to the USA with a company and they give him the opportunity to get his green card, then after five years in America he became an American Citizen which gave him the advantage to sent for his brothers and sisters to come to the USA. Each of them worked hard for five years and became American Citizen. My mother worked hard for me to have the best education at the prestigious Gerard Gourge Preparatory School. I migrated to the states at the early age of fifteen with her three sisters Rith, Marthe, Dany  and three brothers Abraham, Remps and Antoine. I continued on to Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn, NY then attended Essex County College and St. Peter’s College where I graduated in 1991, with an AAS in Arts and science. My working career started as a sales person at Valley Fair then I worked at Food town, Karen’s Curtain, Burger Kings when I was still in High School. After I earned an associate degree in Arts and Science and get my license in Radiology Technology after graduation I worked at Christ Hospital in Jersey City, New Jersey for two years and Union Hospital in Union, New Jersey for seven years. I also worked for Dr. Botwin and Innella for about one year part-time. While working in the operating room at Christ hospital a nurse mentioned to me that my neck was too big and I should go see an Endocrinologist. I found out that I had hyperthyroidism; I understood that was the reasons for my fatigue, sweaty feet, palpitation and mood swing. Soon after I met my ex-husband Jose Diaz-Cervo at Union Hospital in the Radiology Department, both of us worked there. Jose and I got married in 1995; I became the mother of his two children Daniel 4 1/2 and Kassandra 2 1/2 years old from a previous marriage. Due to complication from my thyroid surgery, I was informing by my doctor that I may not be able to have children. Eventually, Jose Diaz-Cervo and I have two children of our own. Prior to that, he and I had a partnership with Bushido Karate in East Hanover. In 1996, while working for Union Hospital, I became a businesswoman by co-founding DiCervo’s Inc/Kingdom Karate World Group LLC. which expand into several facilities and many black belts? With hard work and an impeccable work ethic, I quickly propelled DiCervo’s Inc into a thriving business. My intimate knowledge of the business community and geography of New Jersey make me one of the most qualified Program Director. We owned vending routes in New Jersey for about two years then we sold the route to run the Karate school full-time. I established and maintained positive relationships with parents, and students. I helped to establish expansion into several locations by recruited as many as 30 new clients per month. I developed and managed working staffs and graduated several black belts. I helped the team to generated sales per month and developed and implemented plans to encourage student participation. I implement and managed the development and maintenance of Summer Camp at the center. I carried out weekly treatment meeting and ensured clients are progressing. I did advertising and social Media outreach on networks such as Facebook, Twitter, etc. I promoted private sales & monthly events. I build relationships with bloggers & online publishers. I used database management to track social media & marketing progress. I implemented various projects related to merchandising & items processing. A friend of my ex-husband recruited him in a financial business and as his wife, I had to get involved somehow to work as a team. We worked hard days and late nights to propel in the business. We got promoted to Regional Vice-President in Primerica in 2004. In 2006 life became unbearable for me, my marriage was falling apart, my health deteriorated with hemorrhage. I used my knowledge in the field to develop my skills as a Haitian-American author. My first book entitled My Grateful Book from Dorrance Publishing is a direct result of my hard work as well as life experiences. Unfortunately, I got divorced after thirteen of marriage and it was not a friendly separation. I share my passion for writing by blogging about certain topics and issues which have an impact on my social life. In my leisure time, some of my activities include fashion, traveling, reading and writing as well as staying fit. I am a social butterfly. To reach my goal I have a set time to start the assignment around a learning environment, therefore, the distractions will be minimal. I am committed to managing my time so I can achieve the great result. I believe that I can succeed and overcome the obstacles in my life. I used my phone calendar to keep track of schedule events and it sent me reminders. After my divorce and illness from the thyroid disorder, I now work as an ABA paraprofessional and substitute teacher for special needs children. My success comes naturally from my creativity, a passion for people and my personality described as a social butterfly. I wear different hats in my life because my life is dividing into several categories. I am a creative person and my friend advised me that I work well under pressure. I enjoy the chaos in my life most of the time. I m comfortable being a mother and I am successful at it. I was well connected in the business community, I instilled confidence in people, and they knew they will always get a straight answer from me. In December 2009, I got divorced from my husband of fourteen years and the corporation. My next journey continues with blogging at Fan box then I became a success coach there, however, the company changed policy which made it more like a credit card company. I also work as a substitute teacher and currently continuing my education at the University Of Phoenix. Over 6 years ago, I had a catalyst event that transformed my life. Although it took me some time to come to grips with some of the challenges I was faced with at the time, I realized that I love people; and making a positive difference in their lives is where I get my rewards and satisfaction. I’ve had wonderful opportunities to meet and maintain friendships with some of the most educated and wonderful people. Time and time again, I’m taught that wisdom, understanding, empowerment, commitment and success come from the passion for you and the people in our lives. I wear different hats in my life because my life is dividing into several categories. I am a creative person and my friend advised me that I work well under pressure. I enjoy the chaos in my life most of the time. I m comfortable being a mother, and an ABA paraprofessional and I am successful at it. I will close out this autobiography with the most important thing in my life, my children, and my family. I am in a relationship with a wonderful man and we plan on getting married in two years. I cannot have any more children but we can adopt or be foster parents if we like.

How do you see yourself?

How do you see yourself?

By Javis Brunson @JavisJay

The more you identify yourself with the problems that you encounter, the harder it will be for you to get past them.  If your whole identity is wrapped up in your limitations, what you can’t do, or why me, then how can you ever be free of them?

Wake-up call, life happens, and you will experience problems!

It’s not if you will experience problems, but when and for how long will you be in the mist of the storm.  Don’t let your problems define you.  Operate from a level that is above all the problems, for it is from that perspective you’ll successfully rise above them.

How do you see yourself today?  If you see yourself as a loser, then guess what, that is what you’ll always be, a loser!

However, consider this as a new way of looking at life. Everyday you have the opportunity to take a good look at yourself to see who you are today.  The question is; do you want to continue to being that person?

Here’s a thought for you.  Starting today and continuing for the next 30 days, see you not as a person who has problems, but as a person who creates value out of difficult situations.  See the challenges and limitations not as permanent parts of you, but as stepping stones on the journey to becoming the person that God has truly designed you to be.

Now, how do you want to see yourself today?

Have a Great day and continue doing what you LOVE to do!

The Most Important Moment

The Most Important Moment

By Alex Green

A marriage, a friendship, a close family relationship… All of our important relationships are built on countless moments, innumerable interactions that either build qualities of trust, joy, and respect — or undermine those qualities.

Today I want to show you what is arguably the most important moment for building a trusting, satisfying, loving relationship. We often tend to think that what makes a difference in a romantic relationship, or our relationship with our kids, or other friends and relatives, are the big things; the romantic getaway for the weekend, or the great gift that we buy.

But there is a moment that packs more leverage, more meaning, and more potential for doing good — or harm — than almost any other: The moment when someone we care about asks for our attention.

Changing how we respond in that moment can enliven the entire atmosphere of our relationships. To understand why, we must first look at what happens to us when we’re ignored.

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“One of the most severe punishments for a prisoner is solitary confinement; one of the most hurtful things kids do on a playground is to ditch another kid; one of the most frustrating and hurtful things that friends can do to each other is to give “the silent treatment.” These are all experiences of social isolation; and social isolation is the strongest psychological risk factor for disease. More than stress, more than anything else.

Of course the moments I’m talking about are not as severe as total social isolation, but they are threads of the same cloth. Research shows how even mild experiences can have a huge effect:

Pedestrians who walked past a stranger without getting any acknowledgment from that stranger reported a substantially lower sense of connection to other people — just from that one moment.

People riding an elevator who were completely ignored by the stranger next to them moved from feelings of happiness toward feelings of hurt.

In a computer simulation of a game of catch, when people were not thrown the ball for just five minutes, they felt more sadness, despair and hostility, and less self-esteem, sense of belonging, sense of control, and meaning in life… in five minutes. With a stranger. Even with a stranger they were told they would not like.

Imagine how much more intense it is for us to be ignored by somebody we know and care about.

And yet most of us are unaware of how often we do this.

It is so easy to get caught up in whatever it is that we’re doing, and miss these moments of contact — the moments when the people we care about ask for our attention. We usually think that it will be just fine to respond a little later when we’re done with our task. We do this not because we’re rotten people, or because we don’t care about our mate or our children or our friends, but because these moments can be easy to miss, and we don’t realize the power that’s contained in them.

Sometimes when I tell my clients about this, they say something to the effect of: “But if I respond, won’t I have to do what the other person is asking? What if I’m busy? What if I don’t want to do what they’re asking? Do I have to always drop everything whenever someone wants my attention?”

Let me clarify something that will make doing this much easier, and much more attractive. When somebody — our mate, our child, a friend — asks for our attention, all we have to do to make a better relationship is within that moment when we turn toward them and acknowledge their request. We don’t have to do what they’re asking us to do. Sure, it’s nice if we can, and we want to follow through and be more involved as often as possible; but that’s not the most important thing. What’s most important is the initial immediate response.

Say for example your wife asks if you could help her to do a chore, but you have work to finish, and you can’t reasonably take the time right now to help her.

Just physically turn toward her, and say something like, “I’d like to help, but I have to finish what I’m doing. I’ll be done in about an hour, and I’d be happy to help you then.” Or, “I’m sorry honey; I’ve got my hands full, and I really can’t help you now.”

Or what if your son wants to tell you about an idea he has, but you’re really busy? Turn toward him and take a moment to say something like, “I really want to hear about your idea, but I have some things I need to take care of right now that I can’t put off, could you tell me about it when I’m finished?”

Now, they may be disappointed, but they won’t feel ignored.

The moment that matters most is the initial response, when we physically turn toward the other person and respond to their request for our attention. In that moment we are communicating volumes. We’re saying that we care about them, that we hear them, we see them, and that they matter to us.

On the other hand, when we don’t respond, we’re saying something more like, “I don’t see you, I don’t hear you, I don’t care about you, and you don’t matter to me.” All in a moment.

One of the most important and gratifying experiences that we give one another in a relationship is visibility. The experience of being seen is a deep human need, and our closest relationships are where we meet that need. The more we share these moments, the more resilient our relationships become.

When we have the kind of base that is built by countless friendly, kind, and playful interactions, then when the inevitable hard conflicts or misunderstandings come, they are much less daunting – because they are exceptions to the overall spirit that we’ve created over time. These smaller habits are also what build the foundation that can make the bigger positive events much more fun and satisfying.

There is more to building a great relationship of course. But establishing this simple habit of immediately responding to a request for attention can act as a powerful positive catalyst. It binds with and enhances every other positive thing we do; it can significantly improve your relationships — and it only takes a moment.

About Your Reputation

About Your Reputation

By Cooper, The CEO

Early in your career, things like the college you attended, your GPA and your social circle weigh heavily on your career opportunities. Over time, these are replaced by something far more enduring, your reputation — or what some refer to as a “Personal Brand.”

There are many blog posts and even entire books devoted to personal branding. Most of it’s trivial… Things like how to stand out in a crowd and playing politics to manage people’s perceptions of you. But lipstick-on-a-pig approaches won’t work for building the kind of reputation that opens doors to rich and unexpected career opportunities.

So how do you build a personal brand?

You’re building a reputation every day by what you do, what you say, and how you say it. For most people, personal brand is an accident of personality and preferences.  But, for the truly successful, personal brand is a conscious act rooted in personal values and cultivated behaviors.

Our personal brand is rooted in our personal values. I think of personal values as ‘quirks of personality.’ And our individual quirks cause certain things to be important us… sometimes unreasonably and irrationally important.

We may or may not be able to control our values. That’s above my paygrade, so I’ll stop the armchair psychology and focus on something that certainly is in our control — our words and deeds. 

Building a great brand takes time. So, the sooner you get started, the better. 

What do you want to be known for? What do you want your personal brand to be?

Think about your job… Somewhere there’s a person with your job that is literally the best person at that job in the world. What specific behaviors make them great? 

  • What time do they show up for work?
  • How do they plan their day? 
  • How do they talk to their colleagues?
  • How do they prepare for meetings?
  • What does their finished product look like?

This is probably a new concept for many of you. But take some time to think about the way you conduct yourself. Are your words and deeds creating the reputation you want to have?