Tag Archives: health

16 Tips for Living a Happy Life Starting Right Now

 


By John Rampton @johnrampton

It doesn’t matter your age, how much money you have in your back account, your marital status or what you do for a living, we all want to be more successful in our lives. Of course, defining success is different for each us, but here are 16 proven ways that can make you more productive, happy and successful in life.

1. Be committed.

No matter what goals you have set for yourself in life, you have to be committed. It’s through commitment that you’ll continue to make the improvements needed to better yourself. Whether it’s taking a chance on launching a startup, getting a gym membership to improve your physical well-being, or taking a cooking class because you want to become a chef, commitment is what drives us all to become more successful.

2. People care about you, not your success.

Let’s be honest. People don’t care about the expensive clothes you wear, how big is the house you own or the car your drive. That’s not to say that they don’t respect your achievements or possessions. Instead, they care you as an individual and they’ll support you no matter what — because they love you. Believe it!

3. Be grateful every day.

According to researchers Martin Seligman, Robert Emmons, and Michael McCullough, being grateful can result in feeling better about your life, more enthusiastism and more willingness to help others. Being grateful may even reduce coronary artery disease. Take the time to write down what you’re grateful each and every day.

4. Take action.

In an article in The Atlantic, authors Katty Kay and Claire Shipman share studies on the confidence gap between men and women.  The researchers discovered that confidence is just as important as competence. It was concluded in the article that “[T]aking action bolsters one’s belief in one’s ability to succeed.”

5. Money can’t buy happiness.

As The Beatles famously proclaimed, (money), “can’t buy me love.” You know what else money can’t buy? Happiness. Just because you’re earning six figures doesn’t mean that you’re necessarily content. Sure, money is obviously needed, and it makes some things easier. But, you should be focusing on your passion and not how much your paycheck is.

6. Don’t take rejection personally.

At some point we all face rejection. Instead of taking it personally, use it as a learning experience. Why did a VC reject your proposal? Maybe there wasn’t a market for your product. Perhaps you didn’t have a convincing pitch. Maybe the VC’s partner just called and said he’d spent their extra cash. Accepting and learning from rejection is one way to guide you to success.

With my online invoicing startup I get rejected daily, literally. I talked to 100+ VC’s before I got one that believed in my product. Learn from rejection and use it as motivation to make things better!

7. Have a backup plan.

You never know when the unexpected is going to happen, but when it does happen, you’re surrounded by chaos. Being prepared for the worst case scenario can at least make things a whole lot less chaotic. When my last business crashed, had I not had some cash set aside (that my wife kept away from me), we would have been in financial ruin. Having a three-to-six month nest egg will make the difference. I’ve found that having 12-24 months of cash to pay all bills just sitting there has significantly helped my marriage be more positive as well!

8. Improve your social skill.

After analyzing data from between 1972 and 1992, University of California, Santa Barbara, economist Catherine Weinberger found that “The people who are both smart and socially adept earn more in today’s workforce than similarly endowed workers in 1980.”

9. Travel.

As Yii-Huei Phang states on The Huffington Post, traveling is a great way to “develop a person’s character” and become more open-minded. Additionally, while traveling is a great way to get away from the daily grind, it also helps you appreciate what you have back at home.

10. Don’t multitask.

If you’re feeling constantly burnt out it’s probably because you’re doing too much at one time. Research has found that “when you switch away from a primary task to do something else, you’re increasing the time it takes to finish that task by an average of 25 percent.” You’re also burning your reservoir of energy. Both of these issues decrease your productivity and prevent you from accomplishing tasks and goal.

11. Embrace a growth mindset.

Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck argues that we have two-mindsets; “fixed” and “growth.” A fixed mindset “assumes that our character, intelligence, and creative ability are static.” A “growth mindset,” however, “thrives on challenge and sees failure not as evidence of unintelligence but as a heartening springboard for growth and for stretching our existing abilities.”

12. Balance work and life.

When work interferes with life, it can result in employees getting burned out and decreases base morale in the office. While this may not be an option for employees, it proves that everyone needs time away from the office. If you’re able to spend less time in the office by working remotely or having flexible hours, you should be able to be productive in both your personal and professional life.

13. Don’t hold grudges.

There is really no need to hold onto a grudge. It can mentally wear you out and makes you miserable. And, doesn’t life seem to go a whole lot smoother when you’re not angry?

14. Stick it out.

After years of studying both children and adults, psychologist Angela Duckworth found that one of the characteristics of successful individuals is having grit. During her TED talk Duckworth stated, “Grit is passion and perseverance for very long-term goals. Grit is having stamina. Grit is sticking with your future, day in, day out, not just for the week, not just for the month, but for years, and working really hard to make that future a reality. Grit is living life like it’s a marathon, not a sprint.”

15. Live in the moment

You can’t change the past and you have no control of the future. Live in the moment and enjoy what’s in front of you right here, right now. When you’re busy making too many plans, you’re causing stress that prevents you from enjoying the present.

16. Take care of yourself, then help others.

According to Mark Snyder, a psychologist and head of the Center for the Study of the Individual and Society at the University of Minnesota, “People who volunteer tend to have higher self-esteem, psychological well-being, and happiness.”

Additionally, helping others is beneficial for our health. But, how can you help others if you haven’t taken care of yourself first? Take care of your needs first and then begin to help others.

Avocados

 

10 Health Benefits of Avocados

By Marry Spencer

Avocado is most popular for being a good source of good fat. But it’s also brimming with other nutrients, and has a relatively low calorie count.

If you’re not familiar with all of the health benefits of the avocado, here are just a few:

1. Nutritional Value

Aside from being the only fruit that contains monounsaturated (good) fats, avocados also contain 7 grams of dietary fiber and 2 grams of protein per serving, as well as 485 grams of potassium and 16% of your recommended daily allowance of Vitamin C.

2. Better Cardiovascular Health

Because of this superfood’s ability to lower bad cholesterol, it can easily improive your heart health. According to one study, avocado has properties that can lower low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), also know as bad cholesterol.

3. Healthy Eyesight

Avocado is brimming with nutrients that improve eyesight, including cartenoids such as beta carotene, zeaxanthin, and lutein, which can prevent age-related macular degeneration.

4. Cancer Prevention

Avocados are packed with phytochemicals and antioxidants that have been proven to fight off cancer cells.

Read about 6 more health benefits of avocados.

Let’s Go To church

But For the Lord

By Rick Warren — Jul 31, 2016
Devotional image from Rick Warren

“Fear of man will prove to be a snare, but whoever trusts in the Lord is kept safe”(Proverbs 29:25 NIV).

Satan’s favorite tool to diminish your faith is the fear of failure. But you cannot serve God and be constantly worried about what other people think. You have to move forward. Proverbs 29:25 says, “Fear of man will prove to be a snare, but whoever trusts in the Lord is kept safe” (NIV).

So how do you get rid of the fear of failure?

One way is to redefine failure. What is failure? Failure is not failing to reach your goal. Failure is not having a goal. Failure is not failing to hit your target. Failure is not having a target. Failure is not falling down. Failure is refusing to get back up. You’re never a failure until you quit. So if you’re attempting something for the glory of God, that’s a good thing. Failure is not trying and not accomplishing anything. Failure is failing to try.

Another way to get rid of the fear of failure is to never compare yourself to anybody else. You’re always going to find somebody who’s doing a better job, and you get discouraged. And, you’re always going to find somebody who’s not doing as good a job as you are, and you become full of pride. Both of them will mess up your life. Discouragement and pride will keep you from serving God’s purpose for your life.

The Bible says in Galatians 6:4, “Each of you must examine your own actions. Then you can be proud of your own accomplishments without comparing yourself to others” (GW)

Did you notice that the Bible says there is a legitimate pride? There’s a good kind of pride and there’s a bad kind of pride. The bad kind of pride is comparing: “I’m better than so and so!” The good kind of pride is, “God, I’m proud of what you’re doing in my family, my business, my life, my walk of faith.” That’s the good kind of pride.

When you get to Heaven, God isn’t going to say, “Why weren’t you more like so and so?” He’s going to say, “Why weren’t you who I made you to be?”

Let go of your fear of failure, because anything you’re attempting for God in faith is a good thing, regardless of the results.

Your Diet and Your Body

Obviously, your body type is closely related to how you look.  But did you know that which types of foods you eat and your ability to excel at athletic activities are related to your body type?  Don’t worry, there is no “right” body type and each one has its positive aspects.  Also, we want to note that whichever body type you have does not mean how you look now will forever be the way you look.  Sure, drastically changing your body type is a challenge, but provided you’re willing to work hard enough, you are actually in control of your own destiny.

Before we get to that, let’s first go over the three primary terms used to describe body types and what characterizes each of them.

ecto

1. Ectomorphs

Ectomorphs are generally identified as having thinner limbs and thin bone structures. They tend to have fast metabolisms and the immensely frustrating ability to eat plenty of carbohydrates without showing it. If you’re trying to visualize what an example ectomorph looks like, think of most long distance runners – long, thin, and lithe.  Ectomorphs tend to constantly burn calories.  For them, putting on muscle mass is a constant struggle.  They have to force feed themselves and oftentimes eat far more than they have any interest in doing (while this may sound like a blessing to some, for many ectomorphs, it is a point of constant frustration).

meso

2. Mesomorphs

Think of M to stand for in this case Medium as Mesomorphs have a medium bone structure and fall in between Ectomorphs and Endomorphs. Generally, this body type is characterized as an athletic build with a naturally higher percentage of muscle mass than ectomorphs.  This body type is ideal for explosive sports.  In sticking with the Olympian analogies, you can think of Mesomorphs as your thickly muscled sprinters – not built to go long distances but rather built to generate a lot of power in a short amount of time.  Also, people with this body type tend to have higher testosterone and growth hormone levels, which as a result allows them to maintain low levels of fat.

mendo

3. Endomorphs

At the other end of the spectrum, endomorphs have larger bone structures as well as naturally higher levels of body mass and fat mass.  Exemplary endomorphs are the shot-putters on the Olympic field. In stark contrast to ectomorphs, endomorphs tend to have a harder time burning excess calories and therefore, are likely to carry both more fat and muscle.

Once you’ve identified which body type category you belong to, how should you eat? The following chart shows in simple guidelines to follow:

 

% of Calories from Dietary Sources
  Ectomorph Mesomorph Endomorph
Carbohydrates High (~55%) Medium (~40%) Low (~25%)
Proteins Medium (~25%) Medium (~30%) Medium (~35%)
Fats Low (~20%) Medium (~30%) High (~40%)

Important to note is that when you eat is almost as important as what you eat.  If you’re exercising frequently, then your overall ability to eat high carbohydrate foods regardless of your body type will go up – especially if you eat carbohydrates within a short time period before or after exercise.

To be clear, this is not how to eat for one specific goal but rather a general methodology to work toward moderate muscle gain or weight loss – what will change is simply the amount of calories consumed. For someone who is trying to put on muscle (be it an ectomorph or endomorph) these general dietary splits remain true, however, the amount of calories consumed needs to be increased.

Lastly, it can’t be stressed enough that these are guidelines, not hard and fast rules. Put these guidelines into practice as a starting point and start watching how your body responds. Use your results to iterate to achieve the desired goals.  No two people are alike so no two responses to a diet will be exactly the same.  Test, learn and adjust your way in order to achieve your goals.

While eating for your body type will help with staying healthy, you will probably still have gaps in your nutrient intake. Find out how WellPath can help fill your nutritional gaps and help you reach your health goals.

u may have heard the phrase: “French women don’t get fat.” Frankly, I find it abrupt and provocative, but the truth is, it’s true. In fact, most Europeans enjoy a nice silhouette, so they must be doing something right (Read on to find out what). Don’t worry; I know their tricks. I spent about half of my life in Europe before coming to this great country and eventually becoming a proud American. Today, it just so happens that I received the following email from a reader, so this is my chance to unveil the secrets. “Hello Chef, I purchased your Eat More Burn More cookbook and have made several delicious meals from it! I still don’t understand how European women can stay thin when they eat croissants, pasta, bread, etc… all the time! Unless, they make these things with the adjustments you suggest. And what about eating out?? Our family will be spending 2.5 weeks in Italy this month — eating in restaurants often!! Any advice at how we can successfully do this? How do I get around the croissant breakfasts and pasta??? Thank you!” — Lorine Answer: Great questions, Lorine. You see, the more I spend time in the US, the more I understand the cultural differences between the US and Europe, as they relate to nutrition, exercise, and healthy eating. How do European women keep their figure? Well, first, things are changing and the adoption of an American lifestyle by Europeans makes things a little harder for them. Nonetheless, there are details in their lifestyle that make a big difference I think. Here they are: Soft exercise is one of them (you walk everywhere in Europe). Having longer meals and taking the time to enjoy, and have conversations at the dinner table. That also makes a difference (digestion takes more time, which helps). The portions are smaller. The food is more authentic and healthier as a general rule (less processed foods). Europeans eat more fiber (more veggies, more nuts, seeds, less empty calories). Pastries and sweets are usually enjoyed at the end of the meal. Less fast food. All this makes a huge difference. It makes the difference. Lorine, I’ll be surprised if your family gains weight during your trip to Italy. Please let me know when you get back. I bet you’ll be all fine. Enjoy your trip, live like an Italian (enjoy the small portion of pasta as an “appetizer,” walk everywhere, eat what the locals put in front of you, have a glass of red wine daily, chit chat with your hosts…), and don’t worry so much about gaining weight. In my experience, when my US relatives visit my family in France, they actually lose weight! The food there is actually much more fiber oriented, with less empty calories and less sugar. And that is exactly what I promote in my book Eat More, Burn More. Have a good trip and let me know if I’m right. :)

By Gui Alinat

You may have heard the phrase: “French women don’t get fat.” Frankly, I find it abrupt and provocative, but the truth is, it’s true.

In fact, most Europeans enjoy a nice silhouette, so they must be doing something right (Read on to find out what).

Don’t worry; I know their tricks. I spent about half of my life in Europe before coming to this great country and eventually becoming a proud American.

Today, it just so happens that I received the following email from a reader, so this is my chance to unveil the secrets.

“Hello Chef,
I purchased your Eat More Burn More cookbook and have made several delicious meals from it! I still don’t understand how European women can stay thin when they eat croissants, pasta, bread, etc… all the time! Unless, they make these things with the adjustments you suggest. And what about eating out?? Our family will be spending 2.5 weeks in Italy this month — eating in restaurants often!! Any advice at how we can successfully do this? How do I get around the croissant breakfasts and pasta??? Thank you!”
— Lorine

Answer:
Great questions, Lorine.

You see, the more I spend time in the US, the more I understand the cultural differences between the US and Europe, as they relate to nutrition, exercise, and healthy eating.

How do European women keep their figure? Well, first, things are changing and the adoption of an American lifestyle by Europeans makes things a little harder for them. Nonetheless, there are details in their lifestyle that make a big difference I think.

Here they are:

  1. Soft exercise is one of them (you walk everywhere in Europe).
  2. Having longer meals and taking the time to enjoy, and have conversations at the dinner table.
    That also makes a difference (digestion takes more time, which helps).
  3. The portions are smaller.
  4. The food is more authentic and healthier as a general rule (less processed foods).
  5. Europeans eat more fiber (more veggies, more nuts, seeds, less empty calories).
  6. Pastries and sweets are usually enjoyed at the end of the meal.
  7. Less fast food.

All this makes a huge difference. It makes the difference.

Lorine, I’ll be surprised if your family gains weight during your trip to Italy. Please let me know when you get back. I bet you’ll be all fine. Enjoy your trip, live like an Italian (enjoy the small portion of pasta as an “appetizer,” walk everywhere, eat what the locals put in front of you, have a glass of red wine daily, chit chat with your hosts…), and don’t worry so much about gaining weight.

In my experience, when my US relatives visit my family in France, they actually lose weight! The food there is actually much more fiber oriented, with less empty calories and less sugar. And that is exactly what I promote in my book Eat More, Burn More.

Have a good trip and let me know if I’m right. 🙂

Everyday Things You Can Do To Lower Your Cancer Risk HuffPost Live | By Rahel Gebreyes

This year, more than 1.5 million people are estimated to be diagnosed with cancer. Even more grim is the fact that half of cancer deaths stem from preventable causes. In recognition of World Cancer Day, which pushes positive and proactive approaches to fighting cancer, HuffPost Live took a look at the things that you can do to lower your risk.

While putting down the cigarettes is one aspect of cancer prevention, Dr. Margaret Cuomo told HuffPost Live on Tuesday that regulating one’s diet and exercise habits should be part of the equation. For starters, she recommended a plant-based diet.

“Look at your plate as a round circle … and divide it into two-thirds whole grains, vegetables and fruits, and a third lean protein. That could be poultry, it could be fish,” she said.

So what types of foods should you avoid?

“We discourage red meat because red meat is a risk factor for cancer — especially processed meat, but all red meat — so we want to minimize that,” Cuomo told host Nancy Redd. “The fewer processed foods you bring into your home and onto your plate, the better.”

Physical activity is also a healthy habit that may ward off cancer, Cuomo added, and it doesn’t have to be done at the gym.

“You can build exercise into your work day. Take the stairs instead of the elevator,” she said. “Walk a few more blocks if you take the bus or subway. If you drive, park a little farther away from your destination and walk.”

Health Care Interview

Work with your personal physician and health care providers to keep the lines of communication open and provide the best care possible.•

Adapting to changes

Care of a woman with a suspected or diagnosed gynecologic cancer should be structured like the patient-centered medical home model and be coordinated by a single health care provider (a “team captain”) with multidisciplinary training in the care of women with gynecologic cancer.
• Measurable standards for high quality care for women diagnosed with gynecologic cancer should be determined, validated and tracked. Demonstration projects, registry systems and funding for outcomes-based research are key.
• Several payment systems, including diagnosis-based, episode-of-care reimbursement system in which payment would be based on each diagnostic episode of the woman’s illness rather than on specific procedures, should be developed and tested.

Education requirement

The characteristics necessary for a physician to develop into a successful gynecologic oncologist include an extensive fund of knowledge related to the subspecialties, strong interpersonal skills, and the ability to practice within the complex systems required for management of gynecologic cancer patients, surgical expertise, and the clinical ability to provide comprehensive oncologic care for these women. In order for a trainee to acquire these skills, a gynecologic oncology training program must accept only highly qualified individuals as fellows, have a dedicated core faculty, practice in a supportive environment that has appropriate facilities, and provide adequate clinical material. The gynecologic oncology training program must be organized with an emphasis on education of the fellows. Part of the educational program is formal (lectures, assigned reading, basic skill sets, etc.). Training in clinical and surgical skills is a day-to-day process that occurs during the course of patient care. One requirement of The American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ABOG) is that the fellow spends 12 months of protected time doing research. Fellows are also required to take 2 courses, one in biostatistics and one in cancer biology. A thesis of publishable quality is also required. All programs must perform ongoing quality assurance and reassessment of potential areas for improvement. ABOG is responsible for the accreditation and ongoing monitoring of the fellowship programs.

  • Taking a patient drug history
  • Performing the physical examination
  • Making a medical diagnosis
  • Prescribing appropriate drugs
  • Monitoring a patient’s responses to drugs
  • Modifying the drugs and drug dosages as necessary

Patrick S. Anderson, MD specializes in oncology. An oncologist is a medical doctor who is specifically trained to diagnose and treat cancer. Different types of cancer respond to different treatments, so oncologists must know which treatment is best. Some oncologists specialize in a particular type of cancer. Lung cancerprostate cancerrectal cancerpancreatic cancerbreast cancercervical cancerovarian cancer, and leukemia are examples of various types of cancer.

Patrick Anderson MD is general practitioner and obstetrician & gynecologist licensed to practice medicine in New York and New Jersey. Dr. Anderson specializes in general practice, obstetrics & gynecology, and gynecology oncology and practices medicine at Montefiore Medical Center in 1695 Eastchester Rd Ste L2, Bronx, at Jersey City Medical Center in 120 Irvington Ave, South Orange, and at Bronx Lebanon Ob./Gyn. Group in 1650 Grand Concourse Fl 14, Bronx.

A gynecologic oncologist is a physician/surgeon specializing in treating cancers of the female reproduction system, including ovarian, endometrial, vaginal, cervical and uterine cancer. Gynecologic oncologists are trained as obstetrician/gynecologists (OB-GYNs), and then receive additional training in female reproductive cancer and cancer treatment, including radiation therapy and surgery. These specialists perform biopsies and other surgeries, and are trained to prescribe noninvasive cancer treatments, including chemotherapy and radiation.

Obstetrics and gynecology

has more recently evolved as a primary care specialty for

categorical care for women, including obstetrics and/or gynecological

problems, with female patients going directly to ob–gyn

practitioners without referral.

Degree

MD

Medical School

UMDNJ

Specialties

Oncology Specialist (cancer) and Obstetrician & Gynecologist (OB/GYN)

Years of Experience

20

Languages

Spanish, French, Urdu

Dr. Anderson has 21 hospital affiliations:

  • Monmouth Medical Center
  • Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center Concourse Division Bronx, Bronx Borough
  • Medical Schools:
  • Umdnj–New Jersey Medical School
  • Graduated: 1988
  • Residency Hospital:
  • Albert Einstein College Of Medicine-Yeshiva University
  • Graduated: 1992
  • Fellowship Hospital:
  • Albert Einstein College Of Medicine-Yeshiva University
  • Graduated: 1995
  • Board Certified in Gynecological Oncology
  • Board Certified in Obstetrics & Gynecology
  • Licensed in New Jersey
  • Licensed in New York
  • Chemotherapy
  • Hysterectomy
  • Lumpectomy
  • Mastectomy
  • Ovarian Ablation
  • Robotic surgery is particularly well-suited to both of these procedures, thanks to its excellent visualization of the operating field and the fact that it enhances the ability of surgeons to perform the meticulous dissections required in these surgeries.
  • They work with the oncology team and other specialists like ARNPs and PAs to develop and treat women’s cancers. Interaction with others
  • A Board Certified gynecological oncologist, Dr. Anderson completed his obstetrics, gynecological residency and oncology fellowship at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and is a graduate of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Medical School.
  • Anderson has received awards and honors from national organizations such as the American Cancer Society and the American Institute of Chemistry and is an active researcher and teacher on a variety of subjects in his areas of expertise. He is a Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology and a full member of The Society of Gynecologic Oncologist has co-authored articles that have appeared in prestigious peer-reviewed medical journals such asGynecological Oncology, Journal of Radiation Oncology, Journal of Clinical Oncology and Journal of Women’s Health.

Robotics has changed the landscape of medicine with increasingly streamlined procedures, greater precision and optimal 3D viewing for surgeons and reduced pain and a faster recovery for patients.  The technology, combined with the skillful hand of the surgeon, has raised the standard of care for complex surgeries while affording patients dramatic benefits. The integration of computer-enhanced technology with the surgeon’s skill, robotic surgery enables surgeons to perform precise, minimally invasive surgery in a manner that enhances healing and promotes well-being.

To become a gynecologic oncologist, the candidate must first complete a bachelor’s degree from an accredited school. Many people find it easier to gain admittance to a good medical school with an undergraduate degree in one of the sciences, such as biology, chemistry, or physics. Most students discover it is much simpler to be admitted to medical school when their undergraduate history shows community service or activities in addition to excellent grades.

Before applying to medical school, students are normally required to take and pass medical admission test. These exams test the student’s knowledge in problem solving, science knowledge, as well as written and verbal communication skills. Without a passing score on these exams, the student may be unable to enroll in medical school.

The next step to become a gynecologic oncologist is to complete medical school. During the first two years basic medical subjects are studied, such as anatomy and physiology, biochemistry, and microbiology. The third year focuses on internal medicine, gynecology, and surgery. Electives and choosing a good residency program are both done during the fourth year. Another four years is spent learning, working, and practicing gynecologic medicine within the confines of a medical residency program.

After residency, the final step to become a gynecologic oncologist is to be accepted for and complete a fellowship in gynecologic oncology. These programs last for an additional three years of study, and it can be incredibly difficult to be accepted. During this time, doctors are expected to study an intensive program relating to the female reproductive system as well as the diagnosis and treatment of cancers. Following successful completion of the fellowship, a doctor is considered an expert in her field.

Gynecologic Oncologists are fully trained obstetrician/gynecologists who successfully complete an additional three to four years of intensive training in all aspects of gynecologic cancer care. They understand the pathology and biology of reproductive-tract cancers, and have the expertise to provide comprehensive treatment including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, symptom management and supportive care.

Read more: http://www.vitals.com/doctors/Dr_Patrick_S_Anderson.html#ixzz2OO17ha00

Work with your personal physician and health care providers to keep the lines of communication open and provide the best care possible.•

Adapting to changes

Care of a woman with a suspected or diagnosed gynecologic cancer should be structured like the patient-centered medical home model and be coordinated by a single health care provider (a “team captain”) with multidisciplinary training in the care of women with gynecologic cancer.
• Measurable standards for high quality care for women diagnosed with gynecologic cancer should be determined, validated and tracked. Demonstration projects, registry systems and funding for outcomes-based research are key.
• Several payment systems, including diagnosis-based, episode-of-care reimbursement system in which payment would be based on each diagnostic episode of the woman’s illness rather than on specific procedures, should be developed and tested.

Education requirement

The characteristics necessary for a physician to develop into a successful gynecologic oncologist include an extensive fund of knowledge related to the subspecialties, strong interpersonal skills, and the ability to practice within the complex systems required for management of gynecologic cancer patients, surgical expertise, and the clinical ability to provide comprehensive oncologic care for these women. In order for a trainee to acquire these skills, a gynecologic oncology training program must accept only highly qualified individuals as fellows, have a dedicated core faculty, practice in a supportive environment that has appropriate facilities, and provide adequate clinical material. The gynecologic oncology training program must be organized with an emphasis on education of the fellows. Part of the educational program is formal (lectures, assigned reading, basic skill sets, etc.). Training in clinical and surgical skills is a day-to-day process that occurs during the course of patient care. One requirement of The American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ABOG) is that the fellow spends 12 months of protected time doing research. Fellows are also required to take 2 courses, one in biostatistics and one in cancer biology. A thesis of publishable quality is also required. All programs must perform ongoing quality assurance and reassessment of potential areas for improvement. ABOG is responsible for the accreditation and ongoing monitoring of the fellowship programs.

  • Taking a patient drug history
  • Performing the physical examination
  • Making a medical diagnosis
  • Prescribing appropriate drugs
  • Monitoring a patient’s responses to drugs
  • Modifying the drugs and drug dosages as necessary

Patrick S. Anderson, MD specializes in oncology. An oncologist is a medical doctor who is specifically trained to diagnose and treat cancer. Different types of cancer respond to different treatments, so oncologists must know which treatment is best. Some oncologists specialize in a particular type of cancer. Lung cancerprostate cancerrectal cancerpancreatic cancerbreast cancercervical cancerovarian cancer, and leukemia are examples of various types of cancer.

Patrick Anderson MD is general practitioner and obstetrician & gynecologist licensed to practice medicine in New York and New Jersey. Dr. Anderson specializes in general practice, obstetrics & gynecology, and gynecology oncology and practices medicine at Montefiore Medical Center in 1695 Eastchester Rd Ste L2, Bronx, at Jersey City Medical Center in 120 Irvington Ave, South Orange, and at Bronx Lebanon Ob./Gyn. Group in 1650 Grand Concourse Fl 14, Bronx.

A gynecologic oncologist is a physician/surgeon specializing in treating cancers of the female reproduction system, including ovarian, endometrial, vaginal, cervical and uterine cancer. Gynecologic oncologists are trained as obstetrician/gynecologists (OB-GYNs), and then receive additional training in female reproductive cancer and cancer treatment, including radiation therapy and surgery. These specialists perform biopsies and other surgeries, and are trained to prescribe noninvasive cancer treatments, including chemotherapy and radiation.

Obstetrics and gynecology

has more recently evolved as a primary care specialty for

categorical care for women, including obstetrics and/or gynecological

problems, with female patients going directly to ob–gyn

practitioners without referral.

Degree

MD

Medical School

UMDNJ

Specialties

Oncology Specialist (cancer) and Obstetrician & Gynecologist (OB/GYN)

Years of Experience

20

Languages

Spanish, French, Urdu

Dr. Anderson has 21 hospital affiliations:

  • Monmouth Medical Center
  • Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center Concourse Division Bronx, Bronx Borough
  • Medical Schools:
  • Umdnj–New Jersey Medical School
  • Graduated: 1988
  • Residency Hospital:
  • Albert Einstein College Of Medicine-Yeshiva University
  • Graduated: 1992
  • Fellowship Hospital:
  • Albert Einstein College Of Medicine-Yeshiva University
  • Graduated: 1995
  • Board Certified in Gynecological Oncology
  • Board Certified in Obstetrics & Gynecology
  • Licensed in New Jersey
  • Licensed in New York
  • Chemotherapy
  • Hysterectomy
  • Lumpectomy
  • Mastectomy
  • Ovarian Ablation
  • Robotic surgery is particularly well-suited to both of these procedures, thanks to its excellent visualization of the operating field and the fact that it enhances the ability of surgeons to perform the meticulous dissections required in these surgeries.
  • They work with the oncology team and other specialists like ARNPs and PAs to develop and treat women’s cancers. Interaction with others
  • A Board Certified gynecological oncologist, Dr. Anderson completed his obstetrics, gynecological residency and oncology fellowship at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and is a graduate of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Medical School.
  • Anderson has received awards and honors from national organizations such as the American Cancer Society and the American Institute of Chemistry and is an active researcher and teacher on a variety of subjects in his areas of expertise. He is a Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology and a full member of The Society of Gynecologic Oncologist has co-authored articles that have appeared in prestigious peer-reviewed medical journals such asGynecological Oncology, Journal of Radiation Oncology, Journal of Clinical Oncology and Journal of Women’s Health.

Robotics has changed the landscape of medicine with increasingly streamlined procedures, greater precision and optimal 3D viewing for surgeons and reduced pain and a faster recovery for patients.  The technology, combined with the skillful hand of the surgeon, has raised the standard of care for complex surgeries while affording patients dramatic benefits. The integration of computer-enhanced technology with the surgeon’s skill, robotic surgery enables surgeons to perform precise, minimally invasive surgery in a manner that enhances healing and promotes well-being.

To become a gynecologic oncologist, the candidate must first complete a bachelor’s degree from an accredited school. Many people find it easier to gain admittance to a good medical school with an undergraduate degree in one of the sciences, such as biology, chemistry, or physics. Most students discover it is much simpler to be admitted to medical school when their undergraduate history shows community service or activities in addition to excellent grades.

Before applying to medical school, students are normally required to take and pass medical admission test. These exams test the student’s knowledge in problem solving, science knowledge, as well as written and verbal communication skills. Without a passing score on these exams, the student may be unable to enroll in medical school.

The next step to become a gynecologic oncologist is to complete medical school. During the first two years basic medical subjects are studied, such as anatomy and physiology, biochemistry, and microbiology. The third year focuses on internal medicine, gynecology, and surgery. Electives and choosing a good residency program are both done during the fourth year. Another four years is spent learning, working, and practicing gynecologic medicine within the confines of a medical residency program.

After residency, the final step to become a gynecologic oncologist is to be accepted for and complete a fellowship in gynecologic oncology. These programs last for an additional three years of study, and it can be incredibly difficult to be accepted. During this time, doctors are expected to study an intensive program relating to the female reproductive system as well as the diagnosis and treatment of cancers. Following successful completion of the fellowship, a doctor is considered an expert in her field.

Gynecologic Oncologists are fully trained obstetrician/gynecologists who successfully complete an additional three to four years of intensive training in all aspects of gynecologic cancer care. They understand the pathology and biology of reproductive-tract cancers, and have the expertise to provide comprehensive treatment including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, symptom management and supportive care.

Read more: http://www.vitals.com/doctors/Dr_Patrick_S_Anderson.html#ixzz2OO17ha00

IT Project Failures

Project manager one of the leader during IT implementation process and the project can be successful or a disaster upon the strength of the leadership. The person must follow the fundamental aspect during acquisition to eliminate failures.

A champion team is put in place to implement the new system would be part of the process. They would plan, coordinate, budget and manage all parts of the new system. Also a project leader and key individuals from clinical and administrative areas would be focus on the system. A system champion is part of the team and that person is well-respected in the organization and is also a physician who is able to help with pilot testing. That person is also able to train and coach others and build interest within user group.

After the implementation team agreed on the goals and objectives, a project plan is develop and implement. However, the project manager could not implement communication progress or status, the differences in personalities made it impossible for open communication. There were fabrication and inconsistency, in order for an implementation to be successful; they need to have formal and informal style of communication. The health system’s stakeholders were not fully supportive of the system during the proposal and evaluation time. Most of the physicians were against the CPOE system because they were concern it will require too much times. The primary care physician commented, “The hospital is trying to turn me into a 12-dollar an hour secretary, and they aren’t even paying me 12 dollars an hour.” They took too long to set up emails and also the two leading champions for CPOE resigned from the hospital. Also the acquisition process took too long. They only continue with the process of implementation because they did not want to lose the down payment.

Part of the methods would be emails, one on one meetings, articles and regular update at board meetings. The project manager did not want to upset the interim CIO which is one of the causes of the failure and to eliminate this issue; I would off take different approach, such as the time of the day for the meetings, and the place of the meetings. I would give more articles and presentations to the stakeholders to bring them to like the system. Another way would be to continue to communicate with the leadership team and give rewards for a job well done.

IT project implementation failures occur because of several mistakes which could have been avoid if the project manager insert the right leadership, and not worry about how others react.

Electronic Health Records

Management and health care professionals decide which electronic health records system is best suited for them. It must be effective and useful with the organization’s mission and vision. It needs to be up to par with the HIPAA privacy and security regulations. They must define what is the main purpose of the EHR system they are requiring. It makes it convenient from patients and clinicians to development. Electronic Health Records is the paperless type of patient’s medical information; it is upgrade by health care administration set up patient’s data which include medications, vital signs, past medical history, vaccinations, lab results, progress notes, and radiology results. It has the capacity to support different branches of health care. It reduces medical errors because of the accuracy, and clarity of medical information. It helps patients to make better decisions, and reduce repetition of tests and health information is ready faster.

Nurses can enter vitals of patients right away because the system is in the examination room. They can fix any errors such as medications names or if they forget to enter crucial information. Physicians go over test results and prescriptions new medications or manage previous medications; they can set up new appointments and test for patients. Administrations process schedules enter insurance information and can see if patients are approved for clinical trials or chronic disease management programs.
Electronic Health Records are covered under the HIPAA; they are safe and confidential because it deals with person’s health information. The doctors, medical office staff, health care provider and hospitals must have passwords. The HIPAA privacy rule gives federal protections for individual privacy concerning health information, and HIPAA security rule sets national standards that health care providers must abide for the security of electronic protected health information. “At the same time, the Privacy Rule is balanced so that it permits the disclEHRsosure of health information needed for patient care and other necessary purposes. “ (2014) HIPAA set up annual inspections of health care providers, and if they find privacy and security breach, they can penalize them. Some of violations of the Privacy rule might be punished by the department of justice as criminal prosecutions. Penalties are based on the date they occur, also were they mistakes of neglects; however, OCR is the department which notify entities of the penalties and give those opportunities to defend themselves.
EHR increase care for patients by being safe, reliable and reduce errors. It is useful to health care insurers, health care professionals and health care consumers. It reduce medical errors, decrease unnecessary tests and help patients to get better faster.

References:

Wager, K. A., Lee, F. W., & Glaser, J. P. (2009). Health care information systems: A practical approach for health care management (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

U .S. Department of Health and Human Services/ National Institutes of Health. Retrieved from http://www.privacyruleandresearch.nih.gov

Telemedecine

Telemedecine does not have the intimate engagement in person between doctors and the patients but it does keep the line of communication between the two just a far. Telemedecine is the new innovative technology that will bring healthcare to all remote areas for two main reasons.  First, Telemedecine engage patients and medical staff and also improve medical education in remote countries.  But most importantly, Telemedecine increases quality of care, convenience, cost and acceptability of this type of service improve education in remote areas.